My Favorite Long Fiction of 2018

I recently posted a big ‘ole list of my favorite short stories of the year.  It was a fantastic year for short fiction, and I’m still trying to catch up, even though my list is quite long already. As it turns out, it was a fantastic year for long fiction, too. So as with my short fiction list, I feel like I’m just scratching the surface of what’s out there, and I still have reading to do. However, since I’ll never catch up in the next six days (or otherwise), I humbly submit my favorite long reads of the year. Mostly, this means novels, but I’ve also included other things I read in book format, like novellas, novelettes, collections, and anthologies. There are also a few honorable mentions for things not published in 2018, since I’m still playing catch up from prior years’ fantastic crop of publications.

The Speed of Clouds by Miriam Seidel

This novel, at its heart, is a love letter to fandom. Seidel explores the way fan fiction makes space for  the stories and people left out of canon narrative, and revels in the joy of geeky communities. It isn’t just one kind of fandom either, there is love for collectibles, science fiction, music, art, and more, along with fantastic characters, and touching friendships. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

The Only Harmless Great Thing by Brooke Bolander

An absolutely stunning novelette about communal memory, myth, radium girls, elephants, and those the world tries to use up and cast aside. It’s seething with anger, full of poetic language, and all around just a fantastic read. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach by Kelly Robson

A novella set in a post-environmental-disaster world where humans have harnessed time travel, and are using it to try to clean up their mistakes, or least build a better future. Humanity looks very different than it does now, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t subject to the same problems, squabbles, and misunderstandings. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Blackfish City CoverBlackfish City by Sam J. Miller

Like Robson, Miller’s novel is also set in a world that  is post environmental disaster. In this specific case, a floating city where multiple parties are vying for power and control, while other people are merely trying to survive. There are elements of cyberpunk and ecopunk here, and a fantastic cast of characters, coming together in a story of family, secrets, and revenge. Oh, did I mention the killer whale and the massive polar bear? You definitely want to pick up a copy of this one.

The Mere Wife by Maria Dahvana Headley

In a year of truly incredible novels, this one may well be my favorite. It’s a modern re-telling of Beowulf, focused on the female characters, which explores what it means to be monstrous, what it means to become monstrous, and what society sees as monstrous. The novel takes on issues of racism, sexism, the treatment of veterans, class-ism, and so much more. At the same time, it’s a novel of budding friendship and fierce love, and all of it is absolutely gorgeously written. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

The Quartered Heart by E. Catherine Tobler

I am an absolute sucker for E. Catherine Tobler’s Folley & Mallory series. They’re full of adventure, kissing, were-creatures, archaeologists unearthing mysterious tombs and uncovering secrets, danger, gods, and delicious sensory descriptions. Whether it’s Paris in the 1800s, ancient Egypt, or the Realm of the Dead, Tobler brings every single setting in these books to brilliant life. This entry in the series – the second to last – does not disappoint. It deepens Eleanor’s story, and unravels more of her past, while vastly complicating her present. The cast of characters grows, and some familiar faces return, but I don’t want to say to much for fear of spoilers. Suffice it to say, these are excellent books, and everyone should read them. I’ll be sad when the series is over, but luckily there’s also a collection of Tobler’s circus stories coming out next year, and I am already looking forward to it and making extreme grabby hands in its direction.

Dread Nation by Justina Ireland

Ireland presents an all-too-plausible scenario in her alternate history where the civil war ended when the dead rose. Black girls are trained as “attendants” – in reality body guards who put their own lives on the line to keep their white charges safe. Jane, the main character, has a fantastic voice, and Ireland does an excellent job of slowly unwinding her past and revealing family secrets, all while offering up a fantastic, action-packed story that is by turns chilling and touching. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

The Calculating Stars CoverThe Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal

This is another alternate history novel, though with a very different flavor then Ireland’s. It imagines the space-race accelerated as a matter of necessity after an ecological disaster leaves Earth in the process of rapidly becoming uninhabitable. Kowal focuses on the women of the space program who made so many of the astronauts’ flights possible through their calculations and behind-the-scenes work. With everyone needing to leave Earth eventually, sooner or later, women will have to be allowed to actually go into space, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t still a whole lot of resistance to the idea of “lady astronauts”. Kowal does a wonderful job of showing multiple types of prejudice, and how they might play out in the scenario she presents. Her world is meticulously built, and her characters are wonderful. I haven’t yet had a chance to pick up the sequel, The Fated Sky, but I look forward to doing so, as well as reading the other books in the series when they come out.

Witchmark by C.L. Polk

Is an absolutely gorgeous book set in a world of magic, ghosts, war veterans, and family machinations. Dr. Miles Singer is a doctor at a hospital specializing in treating those recently returned from war. He’s a veteran himself, and also happens to be a witch, a fact he needs to keep secret. However when a stranger arrives carrying a dying man in his arm, everything in Miles’ world is turned upside down. Polk uses the lens of magic to look at serious issues such as a trauma, PTSD, and class-ism. This is Polk’s debut novel, and I can’t wait to see what she does next. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse

This is another novel set in a post-ecological-disaster world (funny how that seems to be on people’s minds lately). Rather than a floating city, or an alternate past, Roanhorse gives us a series of scattered settlements in the desert. When the waters rose, the Dinétah managed to survive,  finding themselves in a new world of gods, monsters, and legends. Maggie Hoskie was the protegee of a living god, drawing on her own clan powers to hunt monsters, but she withdrew from the world when her mentor abandoned her. A family comes to her for help finding a missing girl, and Maggie comes out of her semi-retirement to find that someone is deliberately creating monsters and setting them loose on the world. Maggie is a fantastic character, spiky and violent, but allowed to be vulnerable and frightened too. Despite her fear though, she never backs down, and fights fiercely for her friends against monsters, gods, and tricksters. It’s a fantastic, action-packed novel, with wonderful characters, and I look forward to reading additional books in the Sixth World series.

Collections and Anthologies

Transcendent 2 & 3 edited by Bogi Takács

This series just keeps getting better every year, collecting the best transgender speculative fiction from the prior year. There’s a reason Transcendent 2 won the Lammy last year, and I wouldn’t be at all surprised to see another win for Volume 3 this year.

Robots vs. Faeries edited by Navah Wolfe and Dominik Parisien

With a title  like Robots vs. Faeries, this anthology could have easily been goofy, but Wolfe and Parisien are a bad-ass editing team who assembled a truly fantastic line-up of stories. Some are dark, some touching, some humorous, but they are never silly or frivolous. The standouts in the collection were by Seanan McGuire, Tim Pratt, Annalee Newitz, Sarah Gailey, Jonathan Maberry, Madeline Ashby, Delilah Dawson, Alyssa Wong, Maria Dahvana Headley, and Cat Valente.

Sword and Sonnet CoverForget the Sleepless Shores by Sonya Taaffe

A gorgeous collection that draws on myth and history to tell stories of ghosts, loss, longing, love, and so much more. Taaffe’s writing is poetic, rhythmic, and lovely throughout. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Sword and Sonnet edited by Aidan Doyle, Rachael K. Jones, and E. Catherine Tobler

In the interest of full disclosure, I have a story in this anthology, so I’m slightly biased, but it’s full of so many other wonderful stories, it’s worth mentioning. Playing on the theme of battle poets, authors offered up a wide variety of tales, from bear-haunted warriors, to living storms, to a doctor calling on ancient power and song to heal her patients. It’s a truly gorgeous collection through and through, but the stories that stood out to me in particular were by C.S.E. Cooney, Malon Edwards, Anya Ow, Matt Dovey, S.L. Huang, Khalidaah Muhammad-Ali, Samantha Henderson, and Alex Acks.

Honorable Mentions (AKA Non-2018 Titles)

The Beautiful Ones by Silvia Moreno-Garcia

As with all of Silvia Moreno-Garcia’s work, The Beautiful Ones is gorgeously written. It’s a novel of manners, magic, love, and complicated relationships. And while I’m on the subject, I cannot wait for the author’s Gods of Jade and Shadow out next year. Just look at that gorgeous cover!

An Unkindness of Ghosts CoverUnder the Pendulum Sun by Jeanette Ng

I adored everything about this book – the rich language, the creeping sense of dread beneath the surface, the Gothic sensibilities, the characters struggling to make sense of their situation, and Ng’s take on the world of Faerie. Seriously, just go read it now. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

An Unkindness of Ghosts by Rivers Solomon

This is an absolutely gorgeously-written book, though it is by no means an easy read. It’s set on a generation ship that replicates the structure of plantations, with black people as a distinct underclass, working to provide for the rich white folks, and subject to humiliation and violence at their hands. Even so, it is a novel of resistance, friendship, and unraveling family mysteries that does an excellent job of showing what life on a generation ship might actually be like. Solomon does an excellent job of showing the way scientific and technical knowledge is lost and gained over time, and how language and culture shifts by region and through the years. It’s an incredible read, and I cannot wait for the author’s next book, which is inspired by Clipping. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

So there’s my list, woefully incomplete as it may be. What were your favorite reads of the year, published in 2018 or otherwise?

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My Favorite Short Fiction of 2018

The year is almost at an end, and I’m still frantically trying to catch up on everything I missed, but now seems like as good a time as any to reflect on all the wonderful things I did read this year. 2018 was another fantastic year for short fiction. I read a lot of it, but even then I feel like I only scratched the surface. Still, as folks think about what to nominate for various awards this year, I figured I’d share my own favorite reads from the year that was…

In Her Bones by Lindiwe Rooney The Dark – a disturbing and violent story about magic, power, and a woman taking control of her destiny. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Big Mother by Anya Ow, Strange Horizons – a coming of age story about monsters and a group of children straddling the space between worlds. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

To Blight a Fig Tree Before It Bears Fruit by Benjamin Naka-Hasebe Kingsley, Apex Magazine – a chilling story about bodies as commodities and fighting back against those in power. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

The Hydraulic Emperor by Arkady Martine, Uncanny Magazine – an obscure fragment of a cult film, an alien auction, and the power of desire and sacrifice.

Hehua by Millie Ho, Fireside Magazine – a story of murder, identity, assimilation, and the dark side of technology. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

The Glow-in-the-Dark Girls by Senaa Ahmad, Strange Horizons – a powerful story of girls turned into living weapons, and the cost of war. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Wild Ones by Vanessa Fogg, Bracken Magazine – a beautiful story about mothers and daughters, the temptation of being stolen away by faerie, and those who stay behind.

A Witch’s Guide to Escape: A Practical Compendium of Portal Fantasies by Alix Harrow, Apex Magazine – a lovely and bittersweet story of magic, librarians, the power of fantasy, and finding the right book for the right person.

Granny Death and the Drag King of London by A.J. Fitzwater, GlitterShip – a story about queer identity, music, communal grief, and death personified. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

The Secret Lives of the Nine Negro Teeth of George Washington by Phenderson Djeli Clark, Fireside Magazine – another story about bodies as commodities, and various kinds of ghosts.

Flow by Marissa Lingen, Fireside Magazine – a story of nature magic and refusing to be defined by others’ perceptions. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

And Yet by A.T. Greenblatt, Uncanny Magazine – a story that brilliantly combines a haunted house with quantum science, alternate realities, family, and regret.

The Triumphant Ward of the Railroad and the Sea by Sara Saab, Shimmer Magazine – a story of survivor’s guilt, the hungry sea, and a mysterious train. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

The War of Light and Shadow, in Five Dishes by Siobhan Carroll, Beneath Ceaseless Skies – a sensory feast of a story about war, told by a character on the margins of battle, highlighting the power of a good meal, and the importance of a good narrative in shaping history. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Sandals Full of Rainwater by A.E. Prevost, Capricious – a beautiful story of found family, language, and building a new life far away from home. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Snake Season by Erin Roberts, The Dark – a creepy story of children born wrong and unreliable narrators. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

The Sower by Takim Williams, Fiyah #6: Big Mama Nature – an unsettling and effective horror story about nature taking back the planet. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Furious Girls by Julianna Goodman, Fiyah #6: Big Mama Nature – a story that deals with the way society tries to repress and control women’s anger, and the power that anger has to be turned toward good. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

I Frequently Hear Music in the Very Heart of Noise by Sarah Pinsker, Uncanny – a dream-like story about magical architecture, and the confluence of creative works and creative people.

White Noise by Kai Hudson, Anathema Magazine – an eerie story of family, ghosts, and loss. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

The Right Way to Be Sad by Shankar Gopalakrishnan, Strange Horizons – a story about animal empathy, loss, healing, and a very good dog’s capacity for love.

Strange Waters by Samantha Mills, Strange Horizons – a story of accidental time travel, and a sailor trying to get home to her family. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

The Pine Arch Collection by Michael Wehunt, The Dark – a deeply creepy story about an unsettling amateur film project.

He Sings of Salt and Wormwood by Brian Hodge, The Devil and the Deep – an effective horror story of a diver and his artist girlfriend who find themselves the recipients of disturbing gifts from the sea.

Sea Shanties by Amelia Fisher, Apparition Literary Magazine – a story of drowning, and the longing to believe in the otherworldly. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Salt Lines by Ian Muneshwar, Strange Horizons – a queer man longing for home finds himself haunted by a supernatural creature. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Learning to Drown by Kristi DeMeester, Three-Lobed Burning Eye Magazine – a family with a mysterious link to the river, and the jealousy that threatens to tear them apart. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Meat and Salt and Sparks by Rich Larson, Tor.com – an uplifted chimp detective and her human partner set out to solve a murder in a story that explores the nature of sentience and humanity.

The Synchronist by Fran Wilde, Infinity’s End – a literal race against time in a story that explores the complications of clocks, families, museums, and memory.

The Fall, the Water, the Weight by Lina Rather, Augur Magazine – a lovely story about guilt and grief as childhood friends reunite to confront the disappearance of a a friend years ago in the pool beneath a waterfall, which may be a gateway to another world. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Leviathan Sings to Me in the Deep by Nibedita Sen, Nightmare Magazine – an unsettling story of obsession, science, violence, and the songs of whales. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

You Can Make a Dinosaur, but You Can’t Help Me by K.M. Szpara, Uncanny Magazine – a painful, yet hopeful, story about fighting to be seen, complicated family relationships, love, respect, and dinosaurs. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Speak Easy, Suicide Selkies by E. Catherine Tobler, Beneath Ceaseless Skies
– a gorgeous story about found family, transformation, the circus, and the sea. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

The Trees of My Youth Grew Tall by Mimi Mondal, Strange Horizons – a bittersweet story about a woman who loses her son, but finds her way back to a connection with her heritage and herself. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

By Claw, By Hand, By Silent Speech by Elsa Sjunneson-Henry and A. Merc Rustad, Uncanny Magazine – a story about understanding between species, and communication with dinosaurs.

The Passenger by Emily Lundgren, Shimmer Magazine – a dream, or nightmare-like, story about friendship, longinh, and elusive, shifting reality. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Memphis Minnie Sing the Stumps Down Good by LaShawn M. Wanak, Fiyah #7: Music – a story about the mysterious appearance of otherworldly creatures, friendship, and the power of music and voice.

The Chariots, the Horsemen by Stephanie Malia Morris, Apex Magazine – a story about women who fly, and those who try to keep them down.

She Don’t Fade by Die Booth, Vulture Bones – a ghost story about making peace with one’s past.

The Anchorite Wakes by R.S.A. Garcia, Clarkesworld – a story full of gorgeous imagery, about an A.I. learning to transcend her programming. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Dead Air by Nino Cipri, Nightmare Magazine – a found footage story of voice, silence, and a town that guards its secrets with malevolent force. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

A Bond as Deep as Starlit Seas by Sarah Grey – a touching story of a captain and her starship, a bad deal, and fighting to save a friend. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Carborundorum>/Dev/Null by Annalee Flower Horne, Fireside Magazine – a chilling story of technology used to limit women’s freedom, and simultaneously an uplifting story of friendship and women using technology to reclaim control over their lives. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

She Searches for God in the Storm Within by Khaalidah Muhammad-Ali, Sword and Sonnet – a simultaneously gorgeous and painful story of abuse, and women who are storms.

The Pull of the Herd by Suzan Palumbo, Anathema Magazine – a lovely and bittersweet story of animal brides, and being true to one’s nature.

By the Hand That Casts It by Stephanie Charette, Shimmer Magazine – an action-filled story of poison, flowers, assassins, and secret identities. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Memento Mori by Tiah Marie Beautment, Omenana Magazine – a beautifully written and touching story about the friendship between a woman who collects souls and Death. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

It’s Easy to Shoot a Dog by Maria Haskins, Beneath Ceaseless Skies – a tense story of a witch, a dog, a brother, a sister, a debt, and a wish. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Sea-Crowned by H. Pueyo, The Dark – a story of siblings, the sea, and fear of the other.

Some Personal Arguments in Support of the BetterYou (Based on Early Interactions) by Debbie Urbanski, Strange Horizons – a story of AI and “difficult women” with a touch of Gothic flare. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Coyote Now Wears a Suit by Ani Fox, Apex Magazine – a story about tricksters, family, and learning to be yourself. (Reviewed in more detail here.)

Toward a New Lexicon of Augury by Sabrina Vouvourlias, Apex Magazine – a story about the literal and metaphorical magic of community, and fighting back against those in power.

The Starship and the Temple Cat by Yoon Ha Lee, Beneath Ceaseless Skies – a lovely yet heartbreaking story about ghosts, loyalty, and the casualties of war.

Variations on a Theme from Turandot by Ada Hoffmann, Strange Horizons – a story of opera, destiny, and taking control of your own fate.

The Last Banquet of Temporal Confections by Tina Connolly, Tor.com – a mouth-watering story of food, memory, love, and pastries with the power to topple an empire.

How to Swallow the Moon by Isabel Yap, Uncanny Magazine – a gorgeous story of friendship, loyalty, longing, and monsters.

Again, I feel like these stories only scratch the surface of all the wonderful work published this year. In fact, I may continue to update this post as I do more catching up. In the meantime, happy reading!

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Award Eligible Work 2018

In the spirit of practicing what I preach, I’ve assembled here a list of my own eligible work for 2018. In addition to all the usual awards (Nebula, Hugo, etc.), as a Canadian, I’m also eligible for the Prix Aurora Awards.

Short Fiction

A Moment Before Breaking (~7,900 words) published in The Devil and the Deep

In the End, It Always Turns Out the Same (~3,600 words) published in The Dark

With One Tongue (~3,800 words) published in Augur Magazine Issue 1.2

Words in an Unfinished Poem (~7,200 words) published in Sword and Sonnet

The Time Traveler’s Husband (~4,200 words) published in Shimmer Magazine #46

Non-Fiction

Words for Thought, a regular column published at Apex Magazine

Women to Read, a regular column published at The Book Smugglers

Non-Binary Authors to Read, a regular column published at The Book Smugglers

Mother Knows Best, a one-time essay published at Nightmare Magazine

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What Have You Done? What Have You Loved? 2018 Edition

It’s the most wonderful time of the year! Or is that the most nerve wracking? It’s the beginning of award season in SFF world, kicked off by the opening of the Nebula Award nomination period.

As I have done every year for the past few years, I am assembling here a links post compiling various awards eligibility posts from authors, editors, and publishers, along with recommendation posts, and links to various review sites. The goal is to help folks remember what was published this year, or catch work they might have missed. If you are an author/editor/publisher/reader with a post of your own, please let me know! Drop a note in the comments, reach out on twitter (@ac_wise), or send an email to a.c.wise[at]hotmail.com. I update this post regularly and try to keep it in folks’ minds throughout award nomination season, so do check back often!

If you’re in doubt about whether or not you should make an eligibility post – do it! Self-promotion can feel squirmy and awkward, but it’s incredibly useful to those who nominate to know what works are out there, and what category they fall into. You’re doing people a service, so please, please, please, post and share! Now, on to the links, which are broken down by category and organized alphabetically by last name.

Eligibility Posts

Anderson, G.V.

Anathema Magazine

Apex Magazine

Apparition Lit

Bangs, Elly

Bear, Elizabeth

Beck, Rachel

Beckett, L.X.

Blackwell, Laura

Bolander, Brooke

Booth, Ruth EJ

Bovenmyer, Karen

Broaddus, Maurice

Broadswords and Blasters

Buhlert, Cora

Byrne, Kerrie Colleen

Camp, Bryan

Case, Stephen Reid

Cato, Beth

Charette, Stephanie

Chen, Curtis

Chng, Joyce

Cipri, Nino

Clark, P. Djèlí

Codair, Sara

Cohen, L.J.

Coppersmith, Fred

Criley, Marc

Crilly, Brandon

Czerneda, Julie

Daley, Raymond

Dandenell, Karl

Dawson, J.R.

Day, Julie C.

DePass, Tanya

Diabolical Plots

Dollarhyde, Kate

Donnelly, Lizz

Donohue, Jennifer R.

Douglas, Carol Ann

Dovey, Matt

Drayden, Nicky

Duncan, R.K.

Edelman, Scott

Elasigue, Eva

Fan Writers List

Feistner, Victoria

Feldman, Stephanie

Fitzgerald, Elizabeth

Fiyah Magazine

Fogg, Vanessa

Forest, Susan

French, Lee

Gailey, Sarah

Gale, Ephiny

Gallery of Curiosities

Garcia, R.S.A.

Ginther, Chadwick

Greenblatt, A.T.

Goslee, Sarah

Gower, Jasmine

Gray, Lora

Grigsby, Sean

Griswold, Amy

Hardwick, Stuart C.

Harris, Nin

Haskins, Maria

Heartfield, Kate

Heijndermans, Joa

Held, Rhiannon

Hutchins, M.K.

Inklings Press

James, Lauren

Kania, Kathryn

Kemp, Juliet

Kinney, Benjamin C.

Kritzer, Naomi

Kunsken, Derek

Kurella, Jordan

Levine, David

Lewis, L.D.

Li, Mina

Liburd, Tonya

Lingen, Marissa

Lundoff, Catherine

Mack, David

MacNutt, Toby

Malik, Joseph

Mamatas, Nick

Manuel, Keith

Martine, Arkady

Matheson, Michael

Maxwell, Matt

Mayer, Jaime O.

McCosh, Emily

McGuire, Seanan

Mead-Brewer, K.C.

Mohamed, Premee

Moher, Aidan

Mondal, Mimi

Monroe, Ben

Moore, L.H.

Morrison, Diane

Nikel, Wendy

Nordhagen, Johnnemann

Novakova, Julie

O’Brien, Brandon

O’Dell, Claire

Odell, Sandra

Ogle, L’Erin

Oghaegbu, Chimedum

Older, Malka

O’Reilly, Finbar

Osborne, Emma

Osborne, Karen

Palumbo, Suzan

Payseur, Charles

Pinsker, Sarah

Piveral, C.

Polk, C.L.

Powell, Gareth L.

Prevost, A.E.

Rabinowitz, Ted

Rakunas, Adam

Rambo, Cat

Ramdas, Shiv

Rappaport, Jenny Rae

Reardon, Matthew

Roanhorse, Rebecca

Roberts, Erin

Robson, Kelly

Rossman, Jennifer Lee

Rowat, Frances

Rowland, Alexandra

Royce, Eden

Rustad, A. Merc

Sabet, Amman

Sanford, Jason

Santiago, Gabriela

Schoffstall, John

Seiberg, Effie

Seybold, Grace

Singh, Amal

Sjunneson-Henry, Elsa

Stone, Hayley

Stufflebeam, Bonnie Jo

Strange Horizons

Stuart, Alisdair

Szbranski, Henry

Teffeau, Lauren C.

Theodore, R.J.

Theodoridou, Natalia

Toase, Steve

Tobler, E. Catherine

Tomaras, Joseph

Tomlinson, Patrick

Triantafyllou, Eugenia

Trota, Michi

Uncanny Magazine

Valentinelli, Monica

Vogel, Dawn

Vourvoulias, Sabrina

Walker, Tammy

Wallis, Wren

Wanak, LaShawn

Wasserstein, Izzy

Weber, Christopher

Wehm, Darusha

Weimer, Paul

Westin, O.

Wilde, Fran (And a bonus thread specific to non-fiction work.)

Wiswell, John

Worrad, James

Yap, Isabel

Recommended Reading/Favorites Fiction

Amazon Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of 2018 (So Far)

Barnes and Noble Best SFF of 2018

Barnes and Noble Bookseller’s Picks for 2018

Barnes and Noble Best Horror of 2018

Barnes and Noble Blogger’s Choice Best of 2018

Book Smugglers Best Books of 2018

British Science Fiction Association Recommended Reading List (Crowd-sourced. Add your own recommendations!)

Cameron N. Coulter Favorite Short Fiction of 2018

Earl Grey Editing’s Recommended Reading

Fantasy Faction Best Books of 2018

Fantasy Inn’s Best of 2018

Maria Haskins Recommended Reading

Hugo Spreadsheet (Crowd-sourced. Add your own recommendations!)

Hugo Wikia (Crowd-sourced. Add your own recommendations!)

Kirkus Reviews Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of 2018

Kirkus SFF Blog’s Best of the Best

Latinx Authors Database 2018

Library Journal’s Best Books of 2018

Marissa Lingen’s Short Fiction Recommended Reading

Nerds of a Feather Top 9 Books of 2018

Nerds of a Feather Hugo Recommendations: Fiction, Visual Works, Individual Categories, Institutional Categories.

NPR’s Best Books of 2018

New York Public Library’s Best Books of 2018

Paste Magazine’s Best YA of 2018

Quick Sip Reviews Recommended Reading List

Jason Sanford Best Short SFF January – June 2018

Shouting About Queer SF 2018 Recommended Reading

Elsa Sjunneson-Henry’s Recommended Reading

SFWA Recommended Reading List (Crowd-sourced. SFWA members, add your own recommendations!)

Strange Horizons Favorites of 2018

Tiptree Award Recommended Reading List (Note: not all recommended works are 2018.)

E. Catherine Tobler’s Favorites of 2018

Joseph Tomaras’ Favorites of 2018

Tor.com Reviewer’s Choice Best Books of 2018

Tor.com Best Comics of 2018

Eugenia Triantafyallou’s Favorite Short Fiction of 2018

Paul Weimer – Best Books of 2018

John Wiswell’s Favorite Short Fiction of 2018

Review Sites and Resources

The links in this section point to ongoing sites/columns etc. that review work throughout the year. Note, not all work reviewed is published in 2018, so double-check its eligibility before nominating.

Antler Review (monthly reviews, short fiction, long fiction, non-fiction, etc.)

Fiction Unbound (various)

Forest of Glory (short fiction)

In Short (short fiction)

It’s a Jumble (short and long fiction)

Kirkus SFF Blog (short and long fiction)

Lady Business (short fiction, long fiction, media, fan works, etc.)

Locus Online (short and long fiction)

Nerds of a Feather (long fiction, media, comics, etc.)

Non-Binary Authors to Read (short and long fiction, not all 2018 titles)

Otherwordly/NY Times (long fiction)

Quick Sip Reviews (primarily short fiction, some longer works)

Reading the End (various)

Reviews and Robots (various lengths)

Robots with Keyboards
(monthly lists of favorite short fiction)

Salute Your Shorts (monthly short fiction round-ups/reviews)

SFF Reviews (short fiction)

Skiffy and Fanty
(various)
Squee and Snark (short fiction)

Strange Horizons Reviews (short fiction, long fiction, media, etc.)

Tor.com (short fiction, long fiction, media, etc.)

Women to Read (short and long fiction, not all 2018)

Words for Thought (short fiction)

X Marks the Story (short fiction)

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Philadelphia Writing Workshop

On Saturday, November 17, 2018, I will be teaching a session at the Philadelphia Writing Workshop. PWW is a day-long event held at the Sonesta in Rittenhouse Square with various sessions available focusing on topics from novel writing to query letters, picture books to historical fiction. My particular session will focus on Fantasy and Science Fiction, and there’s an option to reserve a session to receive a critique of the first 10 pages of your work from me. You can also book pitch sessions with agents and editors attending the workshop, which is a fantastic opportunity to get your work seen, and maybe even find representation or get published! It appears registration is still open, so if this sounds like your kind of thing, head on over to the website and book your spot now!

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Halloween Favorite: Movies

Here we are on the last Friday in October. The month went flying by, but it’s not quite over yet, which means there’s still time to enjoy more seasonal favorites. Once all the candy has been given out, or consumed, what better way to celebrate Halloween than curling up on the couch with a good scary movie? Or perhaps a cheesy movie? Or something with style, a touch of humor, and a dash of darkness? I have you covered, my friend…

Vincent Price on the set of The RavenOn Halloween, you can’t go wrong with Edgar Allen Poe, Vincent Price, or Roger Corman. If you’re feeling really saucy, why not combine all three with a triple-header Poe-stravaganza of The Pit and the Pendulum, House of Usher, and The Raven. The movies were released more or less back-to-back in 1960, 61, and 63, so why not watch them the way nature intended? I used to make a ritual of watching some combination of these three movies around Halloween every year. They’re full of glorious scenery-chewing, over the top colors, cheap sets, and for some reason, instead of a melancholy and haunting meditation on loss and death, The Raven now features a wizard’s duel and Peter Lorre transformed into the titular bird. Really, what’s not to love? And if you haven’t had enough after those three, rest easy knowing that there are in fact five more films in Roger Corman’s Poe cycle. You’re welcome.

The Rocky Horror Picture Show likely needs no introduction or talking-up from me. It’s a cult classic, and perfect for Halloween. Glitter, leather, fishnets, and murder. Singing, dancing, mad science, and references to other classics such as Frankenstein and King Kong. If you’re up for it, Rocky Horror can even be a participatory experience. Catch a midnight showing at your local theater, recite the lines along with the cast, and come prepared to throw toast at the screen. Don’t forget your corset.

BeetlejuiceBeetlejuice is another another classic that likely needs no introduction. This year, the movie is celebrating its 30th Anniversary, and dagnabit if it doesn’t still hold up. The movie hovers between comedy (the dinner party scene) and true darkness (Beetlejuice trying to force Lydia into being his child-bride, anyone?), and does so with tons of style. It may possibly be the most Tim Burton-y Tim Burton movie ever, and Michael Keaton does a fantastic job as the un-dead exorcist who specializes in ridding houses of the pesky living so ghosts can spend their eternities happily resting in peace. While the movie is more comedy than horror, there are horrific elements, and certain bits of the movie are disturbing the longer you think about it – like the aforementioned attempt at forced marriage – not to mention the fact that it opens with the death of a lovely young couple, and things go downhill for them from there. For the most part though, it’s good Halloween fun, mostly appropriate for the whole family, and you are pretty much guaranteed to have “Jump in the Line” stuck in your head for days afterward, and be happy about it.

HereditaryIn the realm of true horror films, it’s hard to go wrong with The Exorcist. Unless, you know, you enjoy sleeping, or whatever. It’s a classic story – girl meets demon, girl gets possessed by demon, girl ends up spider-walking down the stairs, vomiting pea soup, and levitating while priests try to save her. The best-known scenes aren’t even the scariest ones, though. The most effective parts of the movie come in the quiet moments of carefully built tension – the ragged sound of breathing, the knowledge that something terrible is about to happen, but hasn’t happened yet. That’s not to discount the spider-walk though. That scene is creepy as fuck.

To round things out, I offer up a recent watch, which I’m still thinking about – Hereditary. It’s hard to talk about the movie without giving too much away. Suffice it to say, the trailers for the film set up expectations for a very different kind of movie. The movie that was actually delivered is far more unsettling and haunting in multiple senses of the word. Reality and truth are slippery concepts throughout much of the film, building to a climax that cements the supernatural, but in a way that doesn’t undercut everything that came before. Again, the quiet moments are some of the most effective here, not so much in building tension, but depicting raw grief, loss, and pain more horrifying than anything otherworldly that happens. The otherworldly elements, however, are horrifying too, and images from the film are likely to stick with you for days afterward.

What are your favorite Halloween watches, scary, funny, silly, or otherwise?

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World Fantasy Convention 2018

Next week (Nov 1-4), I’ll be heading to the World Fantasy Convention in Baltimore. I’m looking forward to seeing folks I don’t get to see often enough, and finally meeting in person with some people I’ve only interacted with online. I’m also hoping for some good meals along with time spent in the dealer’s room failing to resist the urge to buy books. There are so many fantastic authors attending, and I look forward to going to readings, and listening to smart people say smart things on panels. I even have two programming items of my own.

Friday – 12:30 p.m. – Reading
I haven’t quite figured out what I’ll be reading yet, but I’m sure I’ll have it figured out by the time I get there.

Sunday – 12:00 p.m. Optimism in the New Dark Age
Panelists: Michael J. Deluca, Sarah Beth Durst, Matthew Kressel, James A. Moore, A.C. Wise

The ’00s brought us a glut of dystopian fiction, but in this new dark political era, what value or function can positive or so-called “hope-punk” fiction bring? Is optimistic fiction head-in-the-sand denialism, or is it mindfully visionary? Who are some of the writers creating this type of fiction? #HopePunk

The full schedule for the convention can be found here. I hope to see you there!

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Halloween Favorites: Novels

Another Friday means another round of Halloween recommendations, and this time, I’m talking about novels. Many of these are works I’ve recommended in one form or another before, but they’re worth recommending again. After all, there’s a reason I keep coming back to them over and over again.

The Red Tree by Caitlin R. Kiernan is a dark, unsettling, psychological tale. Don’t let the cover fool you; the author herself has complained about it on numerous occasions, and it sadly doesn’t do the work justice. On the surface level, it’s a haunted house story. Underneath, it’s the portrait of a woman slowly unraveling, and it pairs nicely with another of my favorite Kiernan novels, The Drowning Girl. Both are novels that get under the skin, and in my case at least, left me uneasy for days after finishing them.

Experimental Film by Gemma Files is another novel I find myself thinking of frequently, even years after first reading it. Like Files’ “each thing i show you is a piece of my death” mentioned in my short story recommendations, the horror revolves around found fragments of film. But that horror quickly seeps off the screen and into the real world, and the truth the characters uncover is far older and stranger than they could have imagined. A highly effective novel, and again, one that definitely lingers.

Hex by Thomas Olde Heuvelt was originally written and published in Dutch, then not just translated, but rewritten, by the author and released in English with a new setting and – as I understand it – new ending. A small New England town is cursed by a presence referred to as the Black Rock Witch. Her eyes and mouth are sewn shut, she can appear and disappear anywhere around town at will, but as long as the stitches remain, and no one tries to leave the town, she won’t do them harm. It’s a story about becoming complacent in the face of horror, and the horrors people visit on each other growing out of that complacency. And as far as striking imagery goes, it’s hard to beat an ancient witch with her eyes and mouth sewn shut.

My Favorite Thing is MonstersMy Favorite Thing is Monsters by Emil Ferris is less a work of horror in its own right, though horrifying things do happen, and more an homage to horror. As suits a graphic novel, the pages are full of stunning art, and it pays tribute to classic horror movie monsters, and the covers of old horror magazine, as well as referencing works of fine art. It’s a deeply human story, and the horrific things that happen are all human-made. The monsters in this case are a shield against the dark, not the things in and of themselves that make the dark terrifying.

A Head Full of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay is a possession story. Or is it? Fourteen year-old Marjorie may be mentally ill, or she may be the victim of demonic possession. Running out of options to pay for her care, her family agrees to a reality television show being filmed in their house, documenting Marjorie’s supposed possession. Again, the prime source of horror here is the humans involved, but there’s plenty of eerie imagery to go around, and the sense of haunting does linger,whether it be of a psychological nature or a supernatural one.

Once again, these are just a few examples of my favorites. And as always, I want to know your favorites as well.

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Halloween Favorites: Television

Continuing my series of posts about things that put me in an October mood, and making recommendations for what to watch and read this Halloween season, this time around I’ll be talking about television shows.

Disney's Halloween TreatAs a kid, I loved Disney’s Halloween Treat, a compilation of shorts and excerpts highlighting animated ghosts, monsters, and of course, Disney villains. It seems there were two versions of this annual show, the other being A Disney Halloween, which featured much of the same materials, but was slightly longer. My favorite segments were always “Night on Bald Mountain” and “Ichabod Crane and the Headless Horseman”. And, of course, the dancing skeletons in the opening credits.

American Gothic only lasted one season, 22 episodes, many of which aired out of order when it was originally shown on CBS, and some of which never even made it to air. But damn it if I didn’t imprint on this show hard when I was in high school, and now I am the happy owner of the full series on DVD. A small Southern town full of secrets, a Sheriff with supernatural powers who may actually be the Devil, his son who wants nothing to do with him, and the ghost of the boy’s murdered sister – you know, a regular happy family. The show does nod to the true Southern Gothic tradition, particularly with its  buried secrets, and employs many of the classic horror trappings – bloody messages of warning spelling themselves out on the walls, a moon that’s perpetually full, and a creepy little kid who can fuck you up with his mind. Plus, American Gothic gave the world the gem that is Sarah Paulson – she’d done some theater before then, but this was her onscreen debut – so it’s worth it for that alone.

American GothicAnd speaking of Sarah Paulson, American Horror Story - my current TV horror jam - feels like a spiritual successor to American Gothic. At very least scratches the same itch for me. Who knows what American Gothic would have become if it had continued past one season. There’s a good chance it would have gone horribly downhill, but American Horror Story manages to prevent that somewhat with its anthology format. Every season is a new series, with different characters (mostly), but many of the same actors. Of course, all the seasons exist in the same universe, so there’s some crossover, and elements from one season can creep in as plot points in another. The show features top-notch actors – the aforementioned Sarah Paulson, Jessica Lange, Kathy Bates, Angela Bassett, Evan Peters, James Cromwell, and many others. It’s a joy watching the actors reinvent themselves from season to season, and sometimes even within a single season. Over the course of seven years (thus far) the series has hit many of the classic horror tropes – haunted houses, creepy carnivals, witches, and horror-filled hotels. The series has its ups and downs, but it’s well-acted, frequently visually stunning, and in a horror-y kind of way, just plain fun. I still have some catching up to do, but at this point I’m sold, and on board for whatever the series wants to do.

Stranger Things has only had two seasons thus far, but right from the get-go, it was pretty much an instant classic. The show taps into 80s nostalgia hard, calling to mind the works of Stephen King, Steven Spielberg, and H.P. Lovecraft, while scattering pop-culture references like Ghostbusters, Dungeons and Dragons, and various arcade games throughout. The show is more than just references though. There’s genuine growth for the characters, and family and friendships are at the heart of the show. The actors are fantastic, and everyone feels perfectly cast. It’s clearly a show made with love, and I can’t wait to see where the Duffer brothers take the story next.

PreacherCan I make the case for Preacher? It make not be strictly horror, but it certainly has horror elements – vampires and other supernatural creatures, an undying killer bent on revenge, the actual devil, and it isn’t shy about liberal sprays of blood. I adored the graphic novel series when I first read it, and I’m really enjoying seeing the changes the show has made, where they’ve re-imagined things, and where they nod to the source material even as they shift things around. The whole cast is fantastic in my opinion, the locations are wonderful, and the way the episodes are filmed – the framing, the choice of lighting – it all feels perfect. I admit I was hesitant when the project was first announced. Could they do they graphic novels justice? The first season felt a little uneven to me, but the show really hit its stride in season two, and it has completely won me over.

Even though I don’t  watch The Simpsons regularly anymore, I do try to tune in for each year’s Treehouse of Horror episode. Now going on their 30th installation of the anthology show, there are of course hits and misses, but its easier to forgive the misses when there are classics like the Simpsons’ take on “The Raven” and “The Shinning”. And even if some of the vignettes fall flat, even a bad Treehouse of Horror is worth watching.

Once again, this is just a small snapshot of worthwhile Halloween fare. What are your favorite horror and Halloween watches?

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Halloween Favorites: Short Fiction

Halloween is my favorite season, and yes, it is a full season and not just a single day. The cooler weather, the leaves rattling in the trees, all things pumpkin, and of course candy and costumes – what’s not to love? It’s also the perfect time of year to immerse oneself in seasonal fiction. In that spirit, every Friday in October, I’ll be posting some of my favorite reads and watches that never fail to put me in mind of Halloween, starting with short fiction.

Scary Stories to Tell in the DarkFirst beloved, best beloved, and always in my heart is the Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark series, three volumes of folklore gathered by Alvin Schwartz, from urban legends, to campfire ghost tales, to eerie poems and rhymes, and everything in-between. Of course, the definitive version of these collections are the ones illustrated by Stephen Gammell whose horrifying illustrations make the stories that much more unnerving. My first encounter with the books was being read one of the stories in a classroom by a teacher. I immediately sought out the full collection in the school library, and eventually purchased copies of my own, reading and re-reading until the covers were cracked and tattered. They make regular appearances on the most frequently banned books list, and probably with good cause, but that’s all the more reason to read them, no matter what your age.

The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman – a classic tale of gas-lighting whose true horror lies in the treatment of the protagonist by her physician husband, but which doesn’t skimp on the haunting and unsettling imagery.

The Color Out of Space by H.P. Lovecraft – elder gods and unimaginable horrors from the deep are all well and good, but for my money, the creepiest of Lovecraft’s stories is this one about an unnatural color that slowly and steadily drains the life from the land and people around it.

October CountryIt’s impossible to pick just one Ray Bradbury story to recommend, so I’ll recommend a whole collection, The October Country, which perfectly encapsulates the notion that Halloween isn’t just one day, or even a season, it’s a whole damn country. It’s a state of mind, a turning of the leaves, and a creeping dark. So many of my favorites are gathered here: Skeleton, The Jar, The Small Assassin, Homecoming, but really, the whole collection is brilliant from beginning to end.

each thing i show you is a piece of my death by Gemma Files and Stephen Barringer – I’m a sucker for found footage and horror stories about film, and this is one of the best, the kind of story that sticks with you long after you put it down.

eyes i dare not meet in dreams by Sunny Moraine – dead girls climbing out of refrigerators, dead girls on train tracks, dead girls wanting everything and nothing and refusing to stay in their graves. This isn’t a traditional ghost story, but it is certainly haunting.

The Husband Stitch by Carmen Maria Machado – another story where the true horror lies in a husband’s treatment of his wife, but playing off the kind of urban legends gathered by Alvin Schwartz, and drawing on the very act of storytelling, complete with instructions to the reader on how to interact with their audience.

Really any collection edited by Ellen Datlow that tends toward the dark and the horrific is a sure bet for Halloween reading, and there are plenty to choose from: The Doll Collection, Nightmare Carnival, Hauntings, or any one of her Year’s Best Horror anthologies.

The stories above are just a small sampling of horrific tales, but they’re certainly a good place to start. What are your favorite short stories to read and re-read around Halloween?

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