More Than Margaret

To paraphrase the Simpsons: it’s easy to miss Canada, all tucked away down there. However, today is Canada Day, so in hono(u)r of that, I wanted to share some recommendations of my favo(u)rite Canadian speculative fiction. When people think of Canadian SF/F/H, they often think of Margaret Atwood and no further. But there’s a whole host of authors out there, born, living, and working in Canada, and their work deserves love and recognition, too. So let’s get to the recommendations, eh?

Novels and Anthologies

Signal to NoiseExperimental Film by Gemma Files – a haunting and unsettling novel about an early film, a mysterious disappearance, and something caught on camera that cannot be unseen.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel – a quiet novel about the apocalypse, survival, and the importance of art and stories.

Spells of Blood and Kin by Claire Humphrey – a novel of magic, healing, found family, violence, and fighting against a bestial nature versus embracing it.

Someplace to Be Flying by Charles de Lint – an urban fantasy in the truest sense, with a city alive with magic, and  spirits walking among humans, sometimes for good and sometimes for ill.

Children of the Black Sabbath by Anne Hebert – exploring the intersection of religion and darkness, where the line between the rituals of the church and the rituals of a backwoods cult are dangerously blurred.

Signal to Noise by Silvia Moreno-Garcia – a novel moving between the past and the present, centered on a group of friends who learn to cast spells using vinyl records.

The Salt Roads by Nalo Hopkinson – a novel interweaving the lives of various women, and goddesses, across years and countries.

Imaginarium: The Best Canadian Speculative Writing – an anthology series with varying editors, collecting the best speculative short fiction and poetry of the year.

Tesseracts – an anthology series from Edge Publishing, now up to twenty volumes, with varying editors and varying themes.

Masked Mosaic: Canadian Super Stories edited by Camille Alexa and Claude Lalumiere – an anthology of Canadian superhero (and villain) stories.

Dead North edited by Silvia Moreno-Garcia – an anthology of Canadian zombie stories.

Clockwork Canada edited by Dominik Parisien – a Canadian steampunk anthology.

Fractured edited by Silvia Moreno-Garcia – an anthology of Canadian post-apocalyptic tales.

Northern Stars edited by David Hartwell and Glenn Grant – an unthemed anthology of Canadian science fiction.

Short Fiction

Tesseracts 9And in That Sheltered Sea, A Colossus by Michael Matheson – a woman haunted by the ghosts of the past in a world watched over by the remains of ancient gods.

The Half-Dark Promise by Malon Edwards – a young girl fights monsters and shadows in her new home town.

The Waters of Versailles by Kelly Robson – a charming story about the magic of indoor plumbing, the glamour of the French court, and staying true to your roots.

The Color of Paradox by A.M. Dellamonica – a story about time travelers trying to prevent a terrible future.

No Sweeter Art by Tony Pi – a story about a candy maker who infuses his delicate creations with life and magic to save the day.

How My Best Friend Rania Crashed a Party and Saved the World by Ada Hoffmann – a charming story of friendship, social hacking, and digital media.

Eleusinian Mysteries by Charlotte Ashley – a mapmaker whose art leads her to a stunning discovery about the moon.

A Good Home by Karin Lowachee – two survivors of war, one human and one not, bond over their loss and trauma in a world that would rather forget about them.

Seasons of Glass and Iron by Amal El-Mohtar – a gorgeous new fairy tale about two women overcoming their fates and their pasts, and forging a friendship.

Scent by Maria Haskins – a creepy little piece of flash fiction about transformation, rich with sensory detail.

Limestone, Lye, and the Buzzing of Flies by Kate Heartfield – a story about two friends who get summer jobs at a historic site and find the ghosts of the past reaching out to claim them.

The Hanging Game by Helen Marshall – an unsettling story about a dangerous children’s game, and kids paying for their parents’ sins.

Notes from Liminal Spaces by Hiromi Goto – a story blurring the line between reality and fantasy and exploring questions of identity, being, and transformation.

The Correspondence Between the Governess and the Attic by Siobhan Carroll – a retelling of Jane Eyre drawing on fairy tales and the Gothic tradition and reclaiming the stories hidden in the margins.

If all those recommendations still aren’t enough, you can browse the past winners and nominees sections of the Sunburst Awards and the Aurora Awards for even more fantastic Canadian fiction. Happy Canada Day, and happy reading!

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