Tag Archives: angela slatter

An Interview with Angela Slatter

Angela Slatter was kind enough to drop by today to talk about her new novel, Corpselight, the sequel to Vigil, which will be published this July. To get things started, I’ll make introductions by shamelessly stealing from Angela’s author bio…

Specialising in dark fantasy and horror, Angela Slatter is the author of The Girl with No Hands and Other Tales, Sourdough and Other Stories, the Bitterwood Bible and Other Recountings, Winter Children and Other Chilly Tales, A Feast of Sorrows: Stories and Black-Winged Angels, as well as Midnight and Moonshine and The Female Factory (both with Lisa L. Hannett). She has won a World Fantasy Award, a British Fantasy Award, a Ditmar, and five Aurealis Awards, as well as being a finalist for the Norma K. Hemming Award.

CorpselightWelcome, Angela, and congratulations on the upcoming publication of Corpselight. For those who may not be familiar, and without giving too much away, what can you tell readers about Corpselight and the series as a whole?

Thanks for having me over! Corpselight is the second book in the Verity Fassbinder series, which is an urban fantasy trilogy set in Brisbane, Australia. It’s a mix of fantasy and crime and a bit of kitchen sink drama that follows the investigator for the Weyrd Council, Verity Fassbinder, who tries to keep the Normal and Weyrd worlds from clashing, assisted (sometimes ably, sometimes not so much) by her ex-Bela and her colleague Ziggy Hassman. Vigil introduced us to Verity and her life, battling garbage golems, rebel angels, a witch who made wine from the tears of children, arguing with grumpy sirens and an even grumpier police inspector, and generally eating a lot of cake.

In addition to your novels, you’re also a prolific short story writer, and you’ve written novellas as well. Do you have a different process for short fiction versus long fiction? Does one come more naturally to you, or are you equally comfortable with both?

The basic rule for short stories is: CUT BACK! The basic rule for novels is: ADD MORE WORDS! The basic rule for the novella is: JUST FIND A HAPPY MEDIUM!

Learning the difference between writing the three forms was a challenge. I started as a short story writer and I hone the editing skills needed to make something nice and short and tight. Then I started to work on novels and OMG there were so many more words required. So, my secret now is planning the structure, knowing what points I need to hit, so I work things out on a spreadsheet, and set minimum chapter word counts for novellas and novels – that helps keep me on track.

Short stories are a lot more free form for me, but I keep a basic three act structure in mind. The first draft is always ugly, ugly brain-vomit. The editing process is when I tidy things up and impose a more solid structure over the top. And yes, it does take a mindset readjustment every time I start a new project. Initially I’d have said the short story comes more naturally, but this far down the track I’m kind of used to both now.

On a somewhat related note, you’ve also co-written work with Lisa L. Hannett. What was the collaborative process like between you?

We’ve written a short story (“The February Dragon”), and two collections (“Midnight and Moonshine” and “The Female Factory”). At first we brainstorm what we think the story/collection is about, then we do some overall very loose plotting. When it comes to something like the collections, we generally start at the beginning (i.e. the first story) and if one of us has a particular spark of an idea, then she starts that story, writes until the brain is empty (generally a chunk of about 2000-2500 words), then sends it back to the other. Then that one reads and edits what’s there, then writes another chunk of new words, then sends it back; so it’s a process of back and forth, editing and new writing until the story is finished, then we go onto the next story in the collection. When all the stories are done, then we do a mega edit to check on overarching storylines, etc, to make sure everything is moving towards the same big story conclusion. By that time there’s basically voice that sounds like neither of us, but also both of us.

At this point in your career, you’re a multiple award winner and nominee, but do you remember how you learned about your first ever award nomination, and what you did to celebrate?

I *think* it was for “Dresses, Three” (Shimmer Art Issue, edited by Mary Robinette Kowal – Hello, Mary!). I suspect I was at work, and as I worked in the Creative Writing School at QUT, so I think my MA supervisor might have shouted it down the corridor. It was exciting, it was my first nomination and I’d only been publishing for a year, I think.

There’s a question I like to ask my fellow Canadian authors, but I’ll ask it to you as an Australian author. Do you think there’s a particular national flavor to Australia speculative fiction? A common set of themes, or a certain voice that makes something especially Australian? If so, do you think it has an influence on your own writing?

Well, as I co-write with a Canadian and can put away vast amounts of salmon, I’m given to understand I’m practically Canadian! Just joking, sorry, Canada – I’m just truly envious of your Prime Minister (I mean, seriously, have you seen ours???)

Wait, what was the question? I think the answer is yes and no – it depends on what you’re writing. I think if it’s dystopian spec-fic or urban fantasy, then yes, there’s a definite Australian flavour to it: if you’re reading anything by Cat Sparks or Thoraiya Dyer or Robert Hood or Sean Williams or Kaaron Warren (to name but a few), then you will absolutely notice something uniquely Australian about it (a lot of that stems from how much we use climate and landscape in our fiction, what with our box seat for the oncoming apocalypse). If you’re reading authors like Karen Miller or Karen Brooks or Sara Douglass or Rjurik Davidson, the epic-y fantasy writers, then it probably doesn’t come through quite as much because that kind of fantasy relies heavily on a faux medieval kind of feel – and we really didn’t have a Middle Ages in Oz.

You run your own interview series on your blog. Do you have a favorite question to ask authors, and if so, how would you answer it yourself?

I think the one that gets me in trouble most is telling people they have to choose only five books to take to a desert island. I would take: Jane Gaskell’s Atlan; Tanith Lee’s Night’s Master; Margo Lanagan’s Black Juice; John Connolly’s Dark Hollow; and Angela Carter’s The Bloody Chamber.

Personally, one of my favorite questions to ask authors is about their non-writing related work. Authors are notorious for working strange jobs, for example J.D. Salinger’s stint as the entertainment director on a luxury cruise line. What’s the most unusual job you’ve ever had, and did it inspire any stories or teach you anything you’ve used in your writing?

Oh, wow. I’ve been a full-time freelancer since 2011, and before then I worked at the Queensland Writers Centre for 3 years, and before that 3 years at the Creative Writing School, so I’ve kind of been in writing and publishing for a long while! My high school job was as a check-out chick at a supermarket, so I guess that taught me a lot about the creative ways people will try to shoplift – haven’t used that in a story yet!

Now that Corpselight is out in the world, what’s next for you? Is there anything in particular you have upcoming that you’d like folks to know about?

Corpselight! Then I’m working on the third and final Verity book. Then I’ll be working on turning The Briar Book of the Dead from a novella to a novel and selling it (it’s set in the world of the Sourdough and Bitterwood collections). Then I want to finish off the Scandalous Lady Detective novel. And then, and then, and then!

Thanks for stopping by!

Thanks so much for letting me come and play!

Leave a Comment

Filed under Author Interview