Tag Archives: award eligible fiction 2016

Favorite Short Fiction of 2016

I recently posted about my favorite novels, anthologies, and collections of 2016. As with my longer form reading, I had the best of intentions of staying caught up with All the Things in short fiction, but the truth is, that was never an achievable goal. We’re in a golden age for short fiction; there’s so much of out there, and so much of it is truly excellent. Of course I’m going to miss stories, and I’ll miss a lot of them. That said, I did read a lot, too. Here are my favorites for the year thus far. Should I manage more catching up by the year’s end, I’ll update the post accordingly.

Palingenesis by Megan Arkenberg – Short Story – Shimmer -  Art, loss, shifting truths, family, and nature reclaiming its own.

The Virgin Played Bass by Maria Dahvana Headley – Novelette – Uncanny – A style-soaked retelling of the Bremen Town Musicians, laced with war, death, and resurrection.

The Tomato Thief by Ursula Vernon – Novelette – Apex Magazine – Shapeshifters, gods, and transformation, both willing and unwilling, set in the same universe as Vernon’s excellent and award-winning Jackalope Wives.

Secondhand Bodies by JY Yang – Short Story – Lightspeed – What happens at the intersection of wealth, beauty standards, jealously, and technology.

The Sincerity Game by Brit Mandelo – Short Story – Uncanny – A relationship played as a game of chicken, mixing truth, lies, and transformation.

Salt and Cement and Other Denials by Sara Saab – Short Story – Lackington’s – An epic story of unrequited love, self-identity, entitlement, gender roles, and self-actualization, all taking place between barnacles rooted to a rock.

Lotus Face and the Fox by Nghi Vo – Short Story – Uncanny – Gods, grief, identity, and determination. (Reviewed in more detail as part of Women to Read: Where to Start – March 2016)

The Opening of Bayou St. John by Shawn Scarber  – Short Story – Strange Horizons – A gorgeous story soaked in a sense of place, about desperate women, unwanted children, and the one person willing to help them.

Godfall by Sandra Odell – Short Story – Giganotosauraus – The bodies of gods as salvage opportunities and what happens to those who mine myths for scrap. (Reviewed in more detail as part of Women to Read: Where to Start – March 2016)

The Shadow Collector by Shveta Thakrar  – Short Story – Uncanny – Sentient flowers and court intrigue.

Red Mask by Jessica May Lin – Short Story – Shimmer – Ghosts, vengeance, and the worth of women combined in what feels like it could be a superhero origin story. (Reviewed in more detail as part of Women to Read: Where to Start – April 2016)

A Fist of Permutations in Lightning and Wildflowers by Alyssa Wong – Short Story – Tor – A haunting story of branching realities, weather, magic, sisters, and loss.

The Governess with the Mechanical Womb by Leena Likitalo – Short Story – Clarkesworld – An unsettling story of semi-mechanical creatures, an eerie invasion of Victorian wannabes, and two sisters coping with grief over the loss of their parents. (Reviewed in more detail as part of Women to Read: Where to Start – April 2016)

A Salvaging of Ghosts by Aliette de Bodard – Short Story – Beneath Ceaseless Skies – An atmospheric and lonely story of deep sea divers, salvage, and ghosts.

Foxfire, Foxfire by Yoon Ha Lee – Novelette – Beneath Ceaseless Skies – A science-fantasy blend of magic, mechs, tricksters, and little gods caught in the midst of a war.

The Right Sort of Monsters by Kelly Sandoval – Short Story – Strange Horizons – What would you sacrifice to gain your heart’s desire? What if what you wished for turned out flawed?

Touring with the Alien by Carolyn Ives Gilman – Novelette – Clarkesworld – A first contact story about truly alien aliens and the struggle to communicate.

The Signal Birds by Octavia Cade – Short Story – Liminal Stories – The brutality of war, and the uses the military might have for women who grow metallic wings. (Reviewed in more detail in June 2016’s Words for Thought.)

Cloud Dweller by E. Catherine Tobler – Short Story – Beneath Ceaseless Skies – A tightrope walker who walks invisible lines in the sky and catches a glimpse of an alternate world beneath and inside his own. (Reviewed in more detail in June 2016’s Words for Thought.)

Left the Century to Sit Unmoved by Sarah Pinsker – Short Story – Strange Horizons – Mysterious vanishings, the weight of grief, and the freedom of falling. (Reviewed in more detail in June 2016’s Words for Thought.)

The Haferbrautigam by Steve Berman – Short Story – The Dark – A disturbing story about appetites left unchecked and the bargains people make in order to live with themselves. (Reviewed in more detail in June 2016’s Words for Thought.)

A Dead Djinn in Cairo by P. Djeli Clark – Novelette – Tor – A steampunk-flavored whodunnit, mashing up myth, mystery, a dapper detective, and gorgeous creatures out of myth and legend. (Reviewed in more detail in June 2016’s Words for Thought.)

Wednesday’s Story by Wole Talabi – Short Story – Lightspeed - Stories nested within stories, highlighting the importance of tales and the power and limit of storytellers. (Reviewed in more detail in July 2016’s Words for Thought.)

1957 by Stephen Cox – Short Story – Apex – Desire, shifting timelines, and the malleable nature of reality.

Things With Beards by Sam J. Miller – Short Story - Clarkesworld – A queer retelling of The Thing/Who Goes There, exploring identity and disguises adopted in order to survive. (Reviewed in more detail in July 2016’s Words for Thought.)

The Drowning Line by Haralambi Markov – Short Story – Uncanny – A story that blurs the line between fantasy and reality as a father is torn between a family curse, the seductive notion of drowning, and trying to save his daughter. (Reviewed in more detail in July 2016’s Words for Thought.)

A Good Home by Karin Lowachee – Short Story - Lightspeed – A man and a machine, both veterans of war, struggle to find a place for themselves in a world where they are uncomfortable reminders of realities people would rather forget.

Cuckoo Girls by Douglas F. Warrick – Short Story – Apex – Final girls and the creatures who hunt them.

Life in Stone, Glass, and Plastic by José Pablo Iriarte -Short Story – Strange Horizons – A heartbreaking story about art and memory, and what deserves to be memorialized. (Reviewed in more detail in August 2016’s Words for Thought.)

The Non-Hero’s Guide to the Road of Monsters by A.T. Greenblatt – Short Story – Mothership Zeta – Tackling the trope of quest stories and slaying monsters while exploring friendship and what heroism truly means.

.subroutine:all///end by Rachael Acks/Alex Acks – Short Story – Shimmer – A painful story about the loss of memory, and an AI caregiver. (Reviewed in more detail in August 2016’s Words for Thought.)

Painted Grassy Mire by Nicasio Andres Reed – Short Story – Shimmer – An atmospheric story about a girl caught between worlds, and the power of her inheritance. (Reviewed in more detail in September 2016’s Words for Thought.)

Her Sacred Spirit Soars by S. Qiouyi Lu – Short Story – Strange Horizons – A gorgeous and poetic story of loss, separation and identity. (Reviewed in more detail in Non-Binary Authors to Read Part 6.)

The Night Bazaar for Women Becoming Reptiles by Rachael K. Jones – Short Story – Beneath Ceaseless Skies – A story of transformation and desire full of gorgeous worldbuilding. (Reviewed in more detail in September 2016’s Words for Thought.)

Those Brighter Stars by Mercurio D. Rivera – Short Story – Lightspeed – A first contact story that explores the relationships between mothers and daughters. (Reviewed in more detail in September 2016’s Words for Thought.)

glam-grandma by Avi Naftali – Short Story – Shimmer – A fun and stylish story about breaking away from expectations and being yourself.

Only Their Shining Beauty Was Left by Fran Wilde – Short Story – Shimmer – A haunting and beautiful story of transformation, longing, and trees. (Reviewed in more detail in October 2016’s Words for Thought.)

My Body, Herself by Carmen Maria Machado – Short Story – Uncanny – An effective story, seething with quiet rage, about women being seen as disposable. (Reviewed in more detail in October 2016’s Words for Thought.)

With Her Diamond Teeth by Pear Nuallak – Short Story - The Dark – A story of blurred identity, laced with violence. (Reviewed in more detail in October 2016’s Words for Thought.)

The Life and Times of Angel Evans by Meredith Debonnaire – Novelette – The Book Smugglers - A stylish, noiresque story about ghosts and destiny.

Shadow Boy by Lora Gray – Short Story – Shimmer – A dark re-imagining of Peter Pan, about a character fighting with their shadow, and searching for themselves. (Reviewed in more detail in Non-Binary Authors to Read Part 6.)

The City Born Great by N.K. Jemisin – Short Story – Tor – Living cities and eldritch beings. (Reviewed in more detail in November 2016’s Words for Thought.)

The House That Creaks by Elaine Cuyegkeng – Short Story – The Dark – A disturbing story about what causes a house to be haunted. (Reviewed in more detail in November 2016’s Words for Thought.)

Everyone from Themis Sends Letters Home by Genevieve Valentine – Novelette – Clarkesworld – A heartbreaking story about virtual reality, and the line between truth and fiction. (Reviewed in more detail in November 2016’s Words for Thought.)

Rooms Formed of Neurons and Sex by Ferrett Steinmetz – Short Story – Uncanny – The nature of self, a phone sex operator, and a brain in a jar. (Reviewed in more detail in November 2016’s Words for Thought.)

Terpsischore by Teresa P. Mira Echeverría (translated by Lawrence Schimel) Novelette – Strange Horizons – An uneasy story of multiple realities. (Reviewed in more detail in December 2016’s Words for Thought.)

Ever Changing, Ever Turning by Yukimi Ogawa – Short Story – Lackington’s – A story about friendship and harsh standards of beauty.

The Wreck at Goat’s Head by Alexandra Manglis – Short Story – Strange Horizons – A gorgeous story of deep sea diving, loss, and ghostly apparitions.

Standing on the Floodbanks by Bogi Takács – Novelette – GigaNotoSaurus – A subtle and layered story exploring magic and the nature of power.

Number One Personal Hitler by Jeff Hemenway – Short Story – Shimmer – A story of grief and loss, complicated by time travel.

Screamers by Tochi Onyebuchi – Short Story – Omenana – A dark story of racial tension, police brutality, fathers and sons, and rage made manifest.

The Orangery by Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam – Novelette – Beneath Ceaseless Skies – A story about women reclaiming their place in myth, and exercising the power of choice.

Painter of Stars by Wang Yuan (translated by Andy Dudak) – Short Story – Clarkesworld – A robot searching for purpose, and finding it through art, losing and gaining hope for humanity along the way.

Marion’s War by Hayden Trenholm – Short Story – Strangers Among Us – An aging solider fights her programming and the treacherous nature of memory and her own unreliable thoughts while she continues to wage a war that ended years ago.

There’s my list as it stands right now. As I said, it may continue to grow. And on that note, what were your favorite stories from 2016? What did I miss that I need to add to my must-read list right now!

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Favorite Novels, Collections, and Anthologies of 2016

You know what I like an awful lot? Books. They’re one of my favorite things. I buy them in great quantities, fill up my bookshelves with them, stack them in tottering piles, and read them with delight. I generally start the year with great ambitions to Read All the Things. This year, I say to myself, is the year I will be fully prepared to make award nominations, because I will be so caught up on all the wonderful books published. Ha! Regardless, I did manage to conquer a good chunk of the many books I had my eye on for 2016. If I manage to squeeze in a few more before year end, I’ll update the post accordingly.

However, before I get to the works published this year, a slight diversion. The reading goal I set for myself for 2016 was to read more non-fiction. There are so many delicious fiction books to read, non-fiction tends to get neglected in my TBR pile, so I wanted to right that. Here are a few titles I particularly enjoyed.
My Life as a Whore
The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the American Dust Bowl
by Timothy Egan, an excellent and highly-readable history.

My Life as a Whore: The Biography of Madam Laura Evans by Tracy Beach, another highly-readable history about life as a prostitute in Colorado in the 1800s. Laura Evans went from prostitute to madam, didn’t take any shit from anyone, and wasn’t particularly interested in playing by the rules, for example sneaking her horse into an indoor winter dance, causing a scene, and a good deal of property damage.

Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic by Steven Johnson, a quick but fascinating look at disease theory, public drinking fountains, the London sewer systems, and discovering the cause of cholera.

Now on to my favorite novels, anthologies, and collections published in 2016 for your general enjoyment and possibly your award consideration.

Novels

Spells of Blood and Kin by Claire Humphrey is a werewolf novel that never once mentions the word werewolf. It also weaves in magic, and mythology, but at its heart, it’s a story about found families – chosen and by birth. It’s also about fighting or embracing the darker aspects of your nature, and finding a way to feel whole. I discussed the book in more depth here.

Kraken SeaThe Kraken Sea by E. Catherine Tobler. This one is a novella, but it’s right on the borderline of being a short novel, so I’m including it here. It’s a stunningly gorgeous book exploring the origins of Jackson’s Unreal Circus and Mobile Marmalade. I wrote about it in more detail here. Magic, monsters, living shadows, and cabarets. What more could you want?

Paper Tigers by Damien Angelica Walters is a ghost story about pain and feeling broken, and the terrible things people do to feel whole. There’s a haunted photo album, promising seductive freedom, a malign presence, and a mysterious house. I wrote more about the book here.

Sword and Star by Sunny Moraine is the final book in the Root Code trilogy. The story started in Line and Orbit feels truly epic in Sword and Star; the stakes are higher, and the world itself feels bigger. It’s full of action, adventure, and quieter moments, too. More thoughts on the book here.

All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders is a book of disparate parts woven into a glorious whole. Magic blends with science, humor with darkness, awkward teenage angst with the end of the world. It’s fun, heartfelt, and you can read more thoughts about it here.

Roses and Rot by Kat Howard is both a love letter to faerie tales and the importance of telling stories, and a literal tale about faeries. It’s also about art, sacrifice, and family, and is gorgeously told. I wrote about it in more detail here.

The Star-Touched Queen by Roshani Chokshi is another novel that draws on myth and the stories we tell to weave a beautiful tale of mysterious strangers, other worlds, a self-rescuing princess accomplishing daring escapes, and a flesh-eating demon in the shape of a horse. Further thoughts can be found here.

Ghost TalkersGhost Talkers by Mary Robinette Kowal blends mystery, romance, and ghosts against the backdrop of WWI, with a group of women trained as mediums passing messages from soldiers who died in battle along to the allied forces. There are genuinely touching moments, and plenty of action. A more detailed review can be found here.

Cloudbound by Fran Wilde is the second book in the Bone Universe Trilogy, deepening the world first introduced in Updraft both literally and figuratively. The city and the characters are explored from new angles, revealing hidden secrets, evolving their relationships, and adding more tangled political intrigue. The descriptions are stunning, the action scenes visceral, and we finally learn what’s below the clouds and where the bone towers originate. More here.

Certain Dark Things by Silvia Moreno-Garcia is a crime-thriller set in a Mexico City where vampires are a real, living alongside humans with varying degrees of cooperation and hostility. Domingo, a garbage picker living on the streets, meets Atl on the subway. At first she appears to be simply a beautiful girl with a genetically modified dog by her side, intriguing enough to Domingo as it is, but he’s even more fascinated when he learns she’s a vampire. He’s spent his life reading vampire comic books, but reality doesn’t quite match up to the fantasy. Atl sleeps in a closet, not a coffin, and she turns into something more akin to a hummingbird than a bat. There are different types of vampires, all with their own strengths, weaknesses, and abilities. Atl is on the run from a rich, spoiled, daddy’s boy of a vampire, seeking revenge for the latest killing in a long-standing feud between their families. Atl pulls Domingo into her world, and he willingly follows her, helping her to hide while looking for a way to get her safely out of Mexico City. The cast of characters also includes, among others, Ana, a cop caught up in the war between vampires and human gangs, and Bernardino, a Nosferatu-style vampire, who is incredibly powerful, but whose body is twisted and pained as a result of his vampirism. All of the characters are fascinating, well-drawn, and fully-rounded. There is a true otherness to the vampires; they aren’t simply humans with sharp teeth and very long lifespans. Their wants and needs are different, and they don’t tend to go around mooning over humans. Certain Dark Things is fast-paced, violent, and laced with quiet moments of humanity. I highly recommend it, particularly for those who think they’re burned out on vampire fiction.

The Obelisk Gate by N.K. Jemisin is the second book in the Broken Earth Trilogy, and it is every bit as fantastic as the first (The Fifth Season). Across the first two books, Jemisin does incredible things with voice, character, narrative style, time, and multiple points of view. She blends fantasy and science fictional concepts flawlessly to build what may be a far-future version of our own earth, or an alternate one, where orogenes have ability to manipulate the earth and essentially do magic. Orogenes are shunned and feared for their powers, turned into weapons and tools, and controlled by guardians. By this second book, Essun (who was Damaya, who was Syenite) has found a temporary home in a community that accepts orogenes. She’s still searching for her lost daughter, taken by her husband after he murdered their son. She’s been reunited with her old mentor and one-time lover, Alabaster, who is slowly turning to stone, and been given the impossible task of restoring the earth’s lost moon. She’s also being followed and watched over by Hoa, a wholly inhuman creature of living stone. Nassun, Essun’s daughter, gets her own point of view chapters in the book, as she comes into her own powers, learns to manipulate her father in order to stay alive, and tries to decide who and what she wants to be. The story is often brutal, by necessity, and the choices the characters are forced to make are terrible. They live in an unkind world, and must be unkind in turn. Sometimes love looks like pain, but Jemisin makes each character so rich and full and alive that all their decisions and actions are understandable and even inevitable. The first two books are gorgeous, and I’m very much looking forward to the third one.

Anthologies & Collections

Clockwork Phoenix 5 edited by Mike Allen is the latest installment in a series collecting stories that are mythic, poetic, lyrical, and liminal – not quite fitting easily into any one category. If you follow the link, you’ll find five sample stories posted for free online, which will give you a taste of the kind of stories Clockwork Phoenix has to offer. A few of my favorites include The Book of May by C.S.E. Cooney and Carlos Hernandez, The Souls of Horses by Beth Cato, and Sabbath Wine by Barbara Krasnoff.

Furnace by Livia Llewellyn, is the author’s second collection, and it is every bit as dark and weird, sexually charged and terrifying as her first. It reprints several stories, and offers up a new one full of malevolent nature come to reclaim the world. The collection is discussed in more detail here.

Singing With All My Skin and Bone by Sunny Moraine is the author’s debut collection, bringing together some of their best dark and bitter-edged tales, exploring the weird, the beautiful, and the painful in equal measure. I’ve already sung the praises of the third book in Moraine’s epic trilogy here, but their short fiction is just as stunning and well-worth your time.

POC Destroy SFPeople of Colo(ur) Destroy Science Fiction edited by Nalo Hopkinson and Kristine Ong Muslim is the latest in Lightspeed Magazine’s destroy series, preceded by women and queers, all with companion volumes focusing on fantasy and horror. Many of the stories and essays are free to read online, but the gorgeous paperback edition includes exclusive content. The anthology offers up original fiction and flash, reprints, essays, art, and author interviews. My favorite stories from the anthology include A Good Home by Karin Lowachee, Salto Mortal by Nick T. Chan, Firebird by Isha Karki, An Offertory to Our Drowned Gods by Teresa Naval, Chocolate Milkshake Number 314 by Caroline M. Yoachim, Four and Twenty Blackbirds by JY Yang, and A Handful of Dal by Naru Dames Sundar. Overall, it’s an incredibly strong collection, and I highly recommend  it.

Children of Lovecraft edited by Ellen Datlow offers up new stories inspired by Lovecraft – tentacled beasties, cosmic horror, and a quiet, creeping sense of dread, minus the racism. Datlow is a master at assembling anthologies, and this one is no exception. My favorites were Nesters by Siobhan Carroll, Little Ease by Gemma Files, and Excerpts from an Eschatology Quadrille by Caitlin R. Kiernan.

The Starlit Wood edited by Dominik Parisien and Navah Wolfe is a collection of retold and re-imagined fairy tales by a stellar line-up of authors. The book itself is also gorgeous as a physical object. My favorites included Seasons of Glass and Iron by Amal El-Mohtar, Reflected by Kat Howard, The Briar and the Rose by Marjorie M. Liu, and Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik.

Hidden Youth: Speculative Fiction from the Margins of History edited by Chesya Burke and Mikki Kendall, is the follow-up to Crossed Genre’s wonderful anthology, Long Hidden. This time around the focus is on younger protagonists. Overall, it’s a strong collection, with some lovely illustrations. My favorites included The Bread-Thing in the Basket by K.T. Katzmann, Feet of Clay by A.J. Odasso, The Girl, the Devil, & the Coal Mine by Warren Bull, In His Own Image by E.C. Myers, and The Mouser of Peter the Great by P. Djèlí Clark.

That’s a lot of wonderful fiction to sustain you in the cold winter months, and perhaps mull over during award season.

To wrap things up, I offer a few bonus recommendations for novels, anthologies, and collections I read this year and would highly recommend, but which were not published in 2016.

Exeperimental FilmDream Houses by Genevieve Valentine

Dangerous Space by Kelly Eskridge

The Apex Book of World SF 4 edited by Mavesh Murad

Experimental Film by Gemma Files

Kindred by Octavia Butler

The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin

A Head Full of Ghosts by Paul Tremblay

So that’s me. What were your favorite books this year, old or new? And what are you looking forward to in the year to come?

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Obligatory Award Eligibility Post 2016

It’s that time of year, time to look back and reflect on what all I did in 2016. Since I’ve been encouraging others to share their eligibility and recommendation posts (please do!), it seems only fair that I do it myself. I’m still catching up on reading, but I’ll be assembling my recommendation posts soon. In the meantime, here’s my award eligible work for 2016.

Short Stories 

Tekeli-li, They Cry, published in Tomorrow’s Cthulhu

Seven Cups of Coffee, published in Clarkesworld

The Ghosts of Mars, published as part of the March Geeky Giving bundle

A Guide to Birds by Song (After Death), published in Clockwork Phoenix 5

In the Name of Free Will, published in Superhero Universe (Tesseracts 19)

The Men From Narrow Houses, published in Liminal Stories

I Dress My Lover in Yellow, published in The Mammoth Book of Cthulhu

The Last Sailing of the Henry Charles Morgan in Six Pieces of Scrimshaw (1841), published in The Dark

How Objects Behave on the Edge of a Black Hole, published in Strangers Among Us

How to Host a Haunted House Murder Mystery Party, published in Bourbon Penn

Novelette

When the Stitches Come Undone, published in Children of Lovecraft

Collection

The Kissing Booth Girl and Other Stories, published by Lethe Press

The collection is eligible as a whole for things like the World Fantasy Award. It also contains two original short stories – Juliet & Juliet(te): A Romance of Alternate Worlds, and It’s the End of the World As We Know It – and two original novelettes – The Astronaut, Her Lover, the Queen of Faerie, and Their Child, and The Kissing Booth Girl.

As a Canadian, I’m also eligible for the Prix Aurora Awards, in addition to awards like Nebula, Hugo, World Fantasy, etc.

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What Have You Done, What Have You Loved? 2016 Edition

ETA: The Nebula Awards are officially closed for nominations, but Hugo nominations are in full swing for attending and supporting Worldcon members. Voting is also open for the Locus Awards, and those are open to anyone who wants to vote.

With everything else going on in the world right now, award season may not be at the top of everyone’s mind, but the art we make is important. Stories are important. So as award season gets under way and 2016 comes to an end, it’s a perfect time to look back and celebrate what you’ve accomplished over the year, as well as celebrating the works you loved.

For the past few years, I’ve assembled a meta post linking to other authors’ awards-eligibility posts, along with recommended reading posts. This is an evolving creature, frequently updated. To get things started, I’ll highlight a few ongoing sites that review and recommend fiction throughout the year. If you have a review post or an eligibility post you want me to link to, drop me a note in the comments, or email me at a.c.wise (at) hotmail.com. On to the links!

Maria Haskins posts Monthly Short Fiction Round-Ups along with Book Reviews. They’re well-worth checking out!

Charles Payseur tirelessly reads and reviews short fiction throughout the year at Quick Sip Reviews and posts monthly round ups (paired with drink suggestions no less) at Nerds of a Feather in A Monthly Taster’s Guide to Speculative Short Fiction. The link goes to the latest post, but browse the archives for more excellent short SFF recommendations.

The good feminist ponies at Lady Business post Quarterly Short Fiction Recommendations, crowd-sourced through reader surveys. They also regularly post novel reviews, fanwork recommendations, and media reviews, so spend some time on their site for all sorts of recommendations. There’s also a recently-added post rounding up some favorite novels of 2016. A specific Hugo Recommendation List post was also recently added to the site.

It hasn’t been updated recently, but the twitter account SFEditorsPicks posts short fiction recommendations from a variety of Year’s Best editors including Steve Berman, Neil Clarke, Ellen Datlow, and Paula Guran, among others.

Jason Sanford posted a mid-year recommendation list of favorite short fiction from January to June. There are also book reviews and in-depth short fiction reviews on his site, so take a look at those as well.

Barnes & Noble posted their booksellers’ picks for The Best Sci-Fi & Fantasy for 2016. There are also monthly recommendations and on their blog.

The recently-launched Bogi Reads the World picks up on Bogi Tackács’ #diversestories and #diversepoems twitter threads with wonderful recommendations of all kinds. Spend some time on eir site and discover some excellent fiction. Updated to note a few round-up posts added to the site: favorite novellas of 2016 and favorite novels of 2016.

SWFA hosts a recommending reading list for all Nebula award categories. Members can suggest works, and the lists are publicly visible whether you’re a members of SFWA or not.

Didi Chanoch started a Wikia of Hugo eligible works, and others can add their own recommendations.

My own short fiction review column, Words for Thought debuted at Apex Magazine in June.

Fred Coppersmith
posted a mid-year storify of his favorite reads of 2016 after reading a story per day all year.

Sam Tomanio has a monthly short fiction review column at SFRevu.

Squee & Snark reviews short fiction throughout the year.

Rocket Stack Rank, rates short fiction throughout the year. They also have a Hugo nomination page, breaking down their ratings and reviews of 2016 novellas, novelettes, and short fiction, among other things.

There is a Tumblr of Hugo-eligible artists.

That’s just to start. I’ll be assembling posts of my own novel and short fiction recommendations soon, and an award eligibility post. Now it’s your turn. Send me your links for recommendation and eligibility posts, and we’ll build this into a handy resource for discovering fabulous fiction from 2016!

Mary Alexandra Agner shares her award eligible short stories for 2016.

K.C. Alexander has an award eligible novel in 2016. She is also Campbell eligible.

Mike Allen lists his award eligible short stories and collection for 2016.

Amazon’s picks for Best Science Fiction and Fantasy Books of 2016.

G.V. Anderson has an award eligible short story, and is also eligible for the Campbell award.

Apex Magazine list their award eligible short fiction for 2016.

Liz Argall’s ongoing Things Without Arms and Without Legs webcomic is eligible in the Best Fan Art category.

Madeline Ashby lists her award eligible novel and short fiction for 2016.

AudioFile Magazine (via Tor) shares their list of Best SFF Audiobooks of 2016.

Richard Auffrey (aka the Passionate Foodie) lists his Favorite Novels and Anthologies of 2016.

The Aurora Awards
site has compiled lists of eligible works in all their categories. Authors and editors are encouraged to add eligible works to the list.

Beauty in Ruins Best of 2016 list.

Helena Bell’s eligible short story for 2016 is I’ve Come to Marry the Princess.

Beneath Ceaseless Skies has a handy voting guide covering how the Hugos work, along with listing their own eligible works in various categories.

Best Sci Fi Books picks their favorite reads of 2016.

Brooke Bolander lists her award eligible short fiction for 2016.

Book Riot lists their Best Books of 2016.

Book Smugglers Smugglivus 2016 invites a series of guest bloggers to talk about their favorite works of the year. Check back for new posts throughout December.

Books, Bones, & Buffy chooses their favorite books of 2016.

Breaking the Glass Slipper rounds up fantasy, sci-fi, and horror novels published by women in 2016.

Martin Cahill lists his award eligible novelette for 2016.

Aaron Cantor’s award eligible short stories and novelette for 2016.

A.G. Carpenter lists her award eligible short stories and novella for 2016.

Beth Cato lists an award eligible novel and a short story for 2016.

Didi Chanoch’s favorite books of 2016 Part 1 and Part 2.

Chicago Review of Books lists their picks for Best Books of 2016.

Joyce Chng lists her award eligible short fiction, poetry, and non-fiction for 2016.

John Chu lists his award eligible short stories and translation work for 2016.

Chloe N. Clark lists her award eligible short fiction and poetry for 2016.

Clarkesworld’s award eligible short stories, novelettes, and novellas for 2016.

Carrie Cuinn shares her award eligible short fiction for 2016.

Aliette de Bodard notes some of her award eligible fiction, and recommends works by others that she considers award worthy.

Alyx Dellamonica lists her award eligible novel, novelettes, and short story for 2016.

S.B. Divya lists her award eligible novella and short fiction for 2016.

Matt Dovey lists his award eligible short fiction and novelette, and notes his first year of Campbell eligibility.

Electric Literature names the 25 Best Short Story Collections of 2016.

Eva L. Elasigue lists her award eligible novel for 2016.

James Everington lists his award eligible books, novella, short fiction, non-fiction, and editorial work for 2016. He also rounds up his favorite novels and favorite short stories of the year. (Note, not all favorite works listed were published in 2016.)

Fantasy Literature posts short fiction reviews throughout the year, but note that not every work discussed was published in 2016. They do also have a specific post noting their favorite books of 2016.

Bill Ferris points to his award eligible short story for 2016.

Elizabeth Fitzgerald gathers up her reviews of award eligible works with a particular focus on the Ditmars, the Nebulas, and the Norton Award.

forestofglory regularly posts short fiction recommendations, monthly round-ups, and other reviews. The link goes to the site in general, so spend some time browsing around!

Teresa Frohock lists her award eligible novella and collection for 2016.

Sarah Gailey lists her award eligible fiction and non-fiction for 2016. She is also Campbell eligible.

Cate Gardner lists her award eligible short fiction and novella for 2016. She also rounds up her favorite novels and novellas and her favorite short stories of the year.

Anne Gibson posts her award eligible short fiction for 2016. She is also Campbell eligible.

Max Gladstone lists his award eligible novel, novelette, and short fiction, and recommends some works he loved in 2016.

Shira Glassman lists her award eligible novel, short story collection, short stories, and novelettes for 2016.

Jeremy Gottwig lists his award eligible novelette and short stories.

Lora Gray lists their award eligible short fiction for 2016.

A.T. Greenblatt lists her award eligible short fiction for 2016.

Nin Harris lists her award eligible short fiction for 2016, and notes that this is her final year of Campbell eligibility.

Alix E. Harrow’s award eligible work for 2016 is The Autobiography of a Traitor and a Half-Savage.

Maria Haskins lists her award eligible short fiction and poetry. She also rounded up her favorite, novels, novellas, novelettes, and short fiction of 2016.

Kate Heartfield lists her award eligible novella and short stories for 2016.

Maria Dahvana Headley lists her eligible novel, novelettes, and short stories.

Ada Hoffmann lists her award eligible novelette, short story, and poems for 2016. She also lists her favorite speculative poems and short fiction by other authors.

Annalee Flower Horne is eligible in the Best Fan Writer and Best Related Work categories for her writing at The Bias and on Twitter.

Crystal Huff lists her award-eligible fan writing and podcast work for 2016.

Alexis A. Hunter lists her award eligible short fiction for 2016.

José Pablo Iriarte lists his award eligible fiction for 2016.

Heather Rose Jones’ award eligible novel, novelette, and non-fiction for 2016.

Rachael K. Jones lists her award eligible short fiction for 2016.

Keffy R.M. Kehrli lists his eligible work for 2016, which includes a short story, and his podcast work on Glittership.

Cassandra Khaw lists her award eligible short fiction and novella for 2016.

Caitlin Kiernan lists several pieces of award eligible short fiction written and published in 2016.

Benjamin C. Kinney shares his award eligible work for 2016. He is Campbell eligible this year.

Kirkus Reviews picks their Best of the Best for 2016.

Gwendolyn Kiste lists her award eligible short fiction for 2016.

Barbara Krasnoff lists her award eligible work and recommends some of her favorite work by others as well.

Largehearted Boy has compiled a massive list of Best of 2016 lists.

Latinxs in Kidlit list their favorite picture books, early reader, young adult, and new adult titles for 2016.

Kate Lechler’s award eligible short story for 2016 is The Beautiful Bird Sits No Longer Singing in the Nest.

Rose Lemberg lists their award eligible short story, novelette, poetry, and editorial work.

Mina Li’s award eligible work for 2016 is Of Peach Trees and Coral-Red Roses, and Dreaming Keys in An Alphabet of Embers.

Darcie Little Badger lists her award eligible short fiction for 2016.

Little Red Reviewer
picks her favorite books of 2016.

Locus Online regularly posts short fiction and book reviews, as does the print version of Locus Magazine. As of February, they have also posted their 2016 Recommended Reading List, which covers multiple categories.

The Los Angeles Public Library chooses their favorite fiction, non-fiction, children’s, and teen’s books for 2016.

S. Qiouyi Lu lists their award eligible short fiction, poetry, and novella for 2016, and notes their Campbell eligibility.

Natalie Luhrs is eligible in the Best Fan Writer and Related Works categories for her writing at Pretty Terrible and The Bias.

David Mack lists his award eligible story for 2016.

Arkady Martine
lists her award eligible short fiction and poetry.

Michael Matheson lists their award eligible short fiction for 2016. They have also assembled an extensive list of recommended work in multiple categories.

Sam J. Miller lists his award eligible short fiction, and recommends some of his favorite reads of 2016.


Aidan Moher
lists award eligible fiction and non-fiction, and notes his favorite works by others for 2016. He is also Campbell eligible this year.

Sunny Moraine lists their award eligible novel, short stories, and collection for 2016.

Silvia Moreno-Garcia lists her award eligible novel and editorial projects for 2016.

Cheryl Morgan lists her award eligible short fiction and podcast work for 2016.

Heather Morris lists several award eligible short stories for 2016.

John P. Murphy lists his award eligible novella for 2016.

Mythic Delirium Books lists their award eligible publications for 2016, including links to some of their eligible stories and poetry.

Nerds of a Feather picks their favorite books of 2016. They have also posted their Hugo recommendations in fiction, visual works, individuals categories including best editor, fan writer, the Campbell award, etc, and institutional categories, including best related work, best semiprozine, fancast, etc.

Wendy Nikel lists her award eligible short fiction for 2016.

Sara Norja lists award eligible short fiction and poetry, and also notes the first year of Campbell eligibility.

NPR’s Book Concierge lists their picks for the Best Books of 2016.

Sandra Odell lists her award eligible short fiction for 2016.

Suzanne Palmer lists an award eligible short story, two novelettes, and a novella for 2016.

Charles Payseur highlights a few of his award eligible short stories for 2016, and notes he is also eligible in the Best Fan Writing category, and this is his second year of Campbell eligibility.

Sarah Pinsker lists her award eligible short stories and novelette for 2016.

Pop Culture Beast’s list of the best books of 2016.

Quill & Quire lists their Books of the Year.

Cat Rambo lists her award eligible work for 2016. She’s also compiling her own list of eligibility post. Add yours to the list!

Renay at Lady Business has put together a helpful Google doc of Hugo eligible work that folks can add to as appropriate.

Kelly Robson lists her award eligible short fiction and non-fiction for 2016.

Anton J. Rose lists his award eligible short fiction and notes this is his first year of Campbell eligibility.

Christopher Mark Rose has one eligible short story for 2016. As it is a pro sale, he is Campbell eligible as well.

Lauren M. Roy lists her award eligible work for 2016.

A. Merc Rustad has several stories eligible in the Short Story category this year.

C.C.S. Ryan lists her eligible short stories for 2016.

Jason Sanford rounds up his favorite novels and short fiction of 2016.

Erika L. Satifka lists her award eligible novel and short fiction for 2016.

Salik Shah has an eligible non-fiction essay at Strange Horizons. He’s also the editor of Mithila Review, which published several original pieces of fiction and poetry in 2016, including the Asian SF Special Double Issue. He also runs an Asian Science Fiction and Fantasy facebook group where you can find fiction recommendations and discussions.

SF Bluestocking’s picks for the best short fiction of 2016.

Eve Shi lists her award eligible fiction for 2016.

Alex Shvartsman lists his award eligible short stories for 2016.

Elsa Sjunneson-Henry lists her award eligible fiction and non-fiction, and notes she is also Campbell eligible this year.

Carlie St. George lists her award eligible short fiction for 2016, and recommends some of her favorite short fiction by others.

David Steffen lists his award eligible short stories for 2016 along with the award eligible fiction he edited for Diabolical Plots.

The Stoker Awards have released a recommended reading list for eligible works in 2016.

Jonathan Strahan shares his favorite short SFF novels of 2016.

Strange Horizon’s reviewers round up their favorite works read and reviewed in 2016 – Part 1 and Part 2. (Note, not all works are published in 2016.)

Jerome Stueart’s award eligible short fiction and fiction collection for 2016.

Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam lists her award eligible short story and novelette, and recommends some of her favorite work by others as well.

RoAnna Sylver lists work eligible in the short story, novel, novelette, related work, and dramatic presentation categories.

Wole Talabi lists his award eligible short stories, novelette, and non-fiction for 2016. He also lists his favorite African Short Science Fiction and Fantasy for 2016. He is also Campbell eligible this year.

Bogi Tackács lists eir eligible novelette, short stories, poetry, and fan writing for 2016.

Tangent Online’s
Recommended Reading List breaks down their reviewers favorite short stories, novelettes, and novellas of 2016.

Shveta Thakrar lists her award eligible short fiction and poetry for 2016. She is also Campbell eligible.

E. Catherine Tobler lists her award eligible short fiction and novella for 2016.

Joseph Tomaras’ award eligible work for 2016, and favorite books of 2016.

Tade Thompson’s eligible short fiction, novella, and novel for 2016.

Tor.com’s Reviewers’ Choice Best Books of 2016. Tor also has posts for their award eligible novels, novellas, and novelettes, their original short fiction, and a round-up of the Best YA of 2016.

Uncanny lists their award eligible novelettes and short fiction for 2016.

Unlikely Story’s award eligible work for 2016.

Valerie Valdes shares her award eligible short story for 2016.

Monica Valentinelli’s award-eligible work includes We Have Always Been Here, Motherfucker, eligible as best fan writing or best related work, and Firefly: The Gorram Shiniest Language Guide and Dictionary in the ‘Verse, also available in the best related work and fan writing category (I believe). Additionally, Monica co-edited Upside Down: Inverted Tropes in Storytelling, which will be published in mid-December, and contains original fiction and essays, which are award eligible.

The Verge picks their favorite fantasy and sci-fi of the year.

Ursula Vernon lists her eligible short fiction, novelette, children’s books, and novel.

Sabrina Vourvoulias’ award eligible short story for 2016 is El Cantar of Rising Sun.

Holly Lyn Walrath lists her award eligible poetry for 2016.

Washington Post’s picks for Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of 2016.

Paul Weimer lists his Top 5 Books of 2016. He has also updated his site with a post listing his award eligible fan writing and podcast work for 2016.

Fran Wilde shares her eligible novel, novella, and short story for 2016, along with tons of recommendations for her favorite short and long fiction, fan writing, comics, editors, and more!

Ziv Wities has assembled a list of favorite short fiction of 2016.

Alyssa Wong lists her award eligible short fiction and novelette for 2016.

Bryan Thao Worra lists his award eligible poetry and non fiction for 2016.

Tristina Wright’s award eligible short story for 2016 is The Siren Son. She should also be Campbell eligible.

Writertopia’s list of Campbell-eligible authors, noting their year of eligibility.

YA Interrobang chooses their favorite YA books of 2016.

Caroline M. Yoachim has several eligible short stories, two novelettes, and a collection out this year.

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