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Pride StoryBundle Interview: Andi C. Buchanan

Capricious Gender Diverse Pronouns CoverIn connection with the Pride Month StoryBundle, I’ll be posting short interviews with some of the contributors throughout the month of June. Catherine Lundoff and Heather Rose Jones will be hosting interviews as well, so keep an eye on their sites too!

Last week, I posted an interview with Craig Laurance Gidney. Joining me this week is Andi C. Buchanan, Editor of Capricious, a wonderful speculative fiction magazine based out of Aotearoa New Zealand. The special Gender Diverse Pronouns Issue is included in the Pride StoryBundle, which contains “Sandals Full of Rainwater” by A.E. Prevost, one of my favorite recently-published stories, and one that continues to stick with me long after reading.

Could you tell readers a bit about the Capricious SFF Gender Diverse Pronouns issue in this StoryBundle and how it came about?

Absolutely! It’s Issue 9 of Capricious and the first special double issue, and it includes 10 science fiction and fantasy stories that all use gender diverse pronouns. Some are explicitly about gender – others include characters who use these pronouns, but whose gender is mostly incidental to the story.

When I say gender diverse pronouns, I essentially mean those that are used irrespective of gender, or to signify gender in ways different to he/him/his and she/her and their translations. It includes singular they, other established pronouns sets like Spivak or sie/hir, and some of the authors’ invention.

It came about partly because I wanted to read more of these stories, partly because authors found some editors prejudiced against them, and partly because I know some people are genuinely not used to a range of pronouns – and I think a great way to become used to them is to read stories.

I’m really happy with how it turned out and I’m hoping to edit a second volume along similar lines at some point in the next few years.

What is your favorite part of the editorial process at Capricious SFF?

I love reading submissions – I don’t have slush readers so while I will sometimes get second opinions on stories I read everything myself. It’s exciting to find new or new-to-me authors with something interesting to say.

I also really enjoy searching for artists and artwork. Some of our covers are commissioned, others use existing work. Finding the right fit for the issue – and my determination to have something different on every cover – has been a challenge, but it’s also fun to look at possibilities, and has introduced me to some amazing artists, including Laya Rose who created the cover for Issue 5 as well as this issue.

What other books or stories do you have out that readers of this StoryBundle might enjoy?

My novella From a Shadow Grave was published last year by Paper Road Press. It’s a queer time travel/historical/urban fantasy story, inspired by a real murder and local ghost story.

My published short stories include Girls Who Do Not Drown (Apex, 2018) about murderous sea horses, island life, gender, and solidarity (and which comes with a warning for suicidality and trans/misogynist violence), Henrietta and the End of the Line (Translunar Travelers Lounge, 2019) which is about a lizard girl who lives on a squid train, and Blaze (Vulture Bones, 2018), a story about young people who live beside a lake of fire.

I’ve also published some short non-fiction, including Design a Spaceship in Uncanny Magazine’s Disabled People Destroy Science Fiction issue.

Aside from your own work, what are some of your ow favorite queer reads you would recommend to folks?

I find it so hard to choose at this point; there have been so many amazing releases recently. I love JY Neon Yang’s Tensorate series and think the latest, The Ascent to Godhood, may be my favourite, which is a high bar. Ada Hoffmann’s The Outside both embraces and subverts cosmic horror, and includes a powerful sapphic relationship. Ida by Alison Evans is at once a science fictional exploration of the decisions we make and a delicately crafted and vivid portrayal of early adulthood. The Deep by Rivers Solomon with Daveed Diggs, William Hutson, and Jonathan Snipes, is powerful, unsettling, and yet gentle. Lastly, and just released, is AJ Fitzwater’s No Man’s Land which is a queer historical fantasy set in Aotearoa New Zealand during World War II.

Thank you, Andi!

As a reminder, Pride Month StoryBundle lets you pay what you wish for an awesome bundle of queer books. For a minimum payment of $15, you can get all 11 books in the bundle. You can also choose to help support Rainbow Railroad with your purchase. Please do check it out, and stay tuned for more interviewers with StoryBundle authors!

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Pride StoryBundle Interview: Craig Laurance Gidney

Spectral Hue CoverIn connection with the Pride Month StoryBundle, I’ll be posting short interviews with some of the contributors throughout the month of June. Catherine Lundoff and Heather Rose Jones will be hosting interviews as well, so keep an eye on their sites too!

First up is Craig Laurance Gidney, the author of A Spectral Hue, which is a gorgeous and haunting novel about the power of art and community, and the ability of art to literally transport the viewer to another world and transform the way they see.

Without giving too much away, could you tell readers a bit about your book in this StoryBundle?

A Spectral Hue is a contemporary ghost story about outsider artists that features an all-black, all-queer cast.

I love the way color and art suffuse a Spectral Hue, and the way the events occurring are seen as a haunting by some, and a calling together to a place of sanctuary for others. Could you talk a bit about the inspiration behind the novel and how it came together?

I was inspired by a particular type outsider artist, like Henry Darger and Madge Gill, who created their work with an almost religious devotion, or viewed their artwork as messages from other realms.

What other books or stories do you have out that readers of this StoryBundle might enjoy?

I’m looking forward to reading Andrea Hairston’s Will Do Magic for Small Change. I adored the first novel set in the same world, Redwood and Wildfire. I love the complexity of her writing, and the way she mingles Science Fiction, Folklore and Blackness. (I also enjoyed Catfish Lullaby and recommend it highly).

Aside from your own work, what are some of your favorite queer reads you would recommend to folks?

More people should know about the trans author Gabriel Squalia. Her novel Viscera is so disgustingly beautiful, full of body horror and weird magic and humor. Full of sentences and imagery that sear.

Thank you, Craig!

The Pride Month StoryBundle lets you pay what you wish for an awesome bundle of queer books. For a minimum payment of $15, you can get all 11 books in the bundle. You can also choose to help support Rainbow Railroad with your purchase. Please do check it out, and stay tuned for more interviewers with StoryBundle authors!

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Read the Rainbow 2020

Pride Story Bundle AuthorsThe Pride StoryBundle is here, and I’m delighted to once again be a part of it! This year’s bundle includes my Nebula-finalist novella, Catfish Lullaby, alongside a fabulous collection of queer books at a pay-what-you-wish price. If you choose to pay at least $15, you get all 11 books included in the bundle, and you can also choose to have a portion of your purchase support the Rainbow Railroad, a wonderful organization that helps LGTBQIA+ individuals escape persecution and relocate from countries and areas where they are unsafe due to their identity and/or sexuality.

As I’ve done in past years, I wanted to once again put together a Pride Month recommended reading list to help you queer up your summer TBR pile. As an extra happy bonus, several of my recommendations happen to be included in the Pride StoryBundle! And now, on to the recommendations…

General Resources

As always, the Lambda Literary Awards is a great place to look for queer reading recommendations across all genres including speculative fiction, poetry, romance, non-fiction and more. A list of this year’s finalists and winners can be found here.

Author and reviewer extraordinaire Bogi Takács focuses on QUILTBAG+ fiction and in particular own voices work in eir reviews, and eir website is a wonderful resource for adding more queer titles to your TBR pile. E also has a Patreon with monthly book-buying guides and more.

Author and reviewer Charles Payseur offers monthly Queer SFF Short Fiction round ups through his Patreon , another great source for your shorter fiction needs.

Author Xan West/Corey Alexander’s website is another excellent resource for queer fiction with a focus on romance, erotica, and kink, featuring various fiction rounds ups and useful links and resources.

Novels, Collections, and Anthologies

A Spectral Hue CoverTranscendent 4: The Year’s Best Transgender Speculative Fiction edited by Bogi Takács. This series continues to impress, gathering the best trans speculative short fiction of the year in one convenient place, and helping to highlight stories that readers might have missed. It’s always a wonderful collection and a great way to potentially discover new-to-you authors.

A Spectral Hue by Craig Laurence Gidney. Conveniently part of this year’s Pride StoryBundle, this novel is simultaneously gorgeous and eerie, positing art as both a haunting and a sanctuary, depending on your perspective.

The Voyages of Cinrak the Dapper by A.J. Fitzwater. Also conveniently part of this year’s Pride StoryBundle, this is an utterly delightful collection which recounts the daring adventures of one incredibly dapper lesbian capybara pirate and her gallant crew. Joyous and queer, full of found family, romance, and excitement. You can read a fuller review of the collection here and my interview with the author here.

Capricious 9: Gender Diverse Pronouns Issue edited by Andi C. Buchanan. I’ve mentioned it before and I’ll mention it again since it’s also part of this year’s Pride StoryBundle and because it’s always worth highlighting this wonderful collection of stories exploring diverse pronouns and identities in a speculative fiction setting.

The Rampant by Julie C. Day. This novella is a finalist for the 2020 Lambda Literary Awards and offers a fresh take on the apocalypse as best friends Emilia and Gillian try to bring about the Sumerian rapture rather than prevent it, while dealing with their own various losses, griefs, and their budding romance. A more detailed review of the novella can be found here.

The Luminous Dead by Caitlin Starling. I’ve recommended it before, and I’ll recommend it again – a tense and claustrophobic sci-fi/horror novel, which finds Gyre, a caver, alone on a dangerous expedition with only her handler, Em, for remote support. In addition to being an excellent sci-fi horror novel, the novel provides a fascinating exploration of unreliably characters and power dynamics through the growing attraction between Gyre and Em.

Pet CoverGamechanger by L.X. Beckett is an epic, sweeping sci-fi novel that explores climate disaster and recovery in both the real and virtual worlds, and features a wonderful rivalry to romance relationship. A more detailed review can be found here.

Pet by Akwaeke Emezi. A powerful YA/Middle Grade novel that explores the concept of monstrosity hidden in plain sight, along with the monstrous nature of angels. Reviewed in more detail here.

Escaping Exodus by Nicky Drayden. A novel with a richly-built world featuring living generation ships, unforgettable characters, dark secrets and impossible choices. I’ve loved everyone of Drayden’s novels so far and this is no exception.

Homesick: Stories by Nino Cipri. The debut collection from a masterful short fiction writer. You can read my interview with the author here and my review of their collection here.

I could go on and on, but how about some short fiction to mix things up? I do love a good short story, and these are some fantastic ones!

Short Fiction

Familiar Face by Meg Ellison. A haunting short story that explores technology as a means of communicating with ghosts, as well as touching on friendship, loss, and grief.

Clarkesworld Issue 154 CoverForgive Me, My Love, For the Ice and the Sea by C.L. Clark. A gorgeously-written secondary world fantasy where the protagonist is faced with the painful truth that she may have to lose her lover in order to save her.

Rat and Finch Are Friends by Innocent Chizram Ilo. A lovely and bittersweet story of friendship, budding romance, and characters who are forced to hide their true selves in order to survive.

Many-Hearted Dog and Heron Who Stepped Past Time by Alex Yuschik. A beautiful and twisting story of love, loyalty, friendship, time-travel, and sacrifice.

Shattered Sidewalks of the Human Heart by Sam J. Miller. A story exploring monstrousness through the lens of classic cinema brought to life.

The Devil Squid Apocalypse by Alex Acks. A bad-ass musician helps save the world from invading squid monsters with the power of music. What more could you want from a story?

These are just a few of the many wonderful queer reads out there that can help bulk up your summer reading list. On that note, since one can never have too many recommendations, what are your own favorite queer reads, long or short? Drop them in the comments and share the summer reading love!

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Queer Summer Reading

Happy Pride Month, y’all! Last year I celebrated with a recommendation post to help fulfill your queer reading needs. Carrying on the tradition with a whole new crop of recommendations seemed like a fine way to celebrate again this year. So hold onto your butts, because I have novels, short stories, podcasts, and publication recs coming your way!

Novels, Anthologies, and Collections

Blackfish City CoverThe Luminous Dead by Caitlin Starling – a creepy, claustrophobic, science fictional horror novel exploring isolation, uneasy and unreliable allies, a deadly cave, and what the combination of being alone in the dark with all of those things does to the human mind.

Blackfish City by Sam J. Miller – last year I recommended Miller’s The Art of Starving. His follow-up novel is just as brilliant in a completely different way, offering up a brutal, post-ecological disaster world with a dash of cyberpunk flavoring, populated with characters willing to go to any lengths to get what they want, including polar bear assisted homicide.

Armistice and Amnesty by Lara Elena Donnelly – the follow up novels to another of my recommendations last year, Amberlough, and collectively known as the Amberlough Dossier. These two installments round out the trilogy, and Donnelly utterly nails it, deepening the characters, expanding the world, and breaking already broken people and places in new and interesting ways. This series might be best described as Politics Punk, with snappy dialogue, alternately lush and decaying settings, and a satisfyingly character-driven plot of shifting allegiances and those willing to do whatever it takes to achieve their goals.

Forget the Sleepless Shores by Sonya Taaffe – a gorgeous short story collection full of hauntings, myths, fairy tales, and history, all soaked in rich language to utterly immerse yourself in.

Transcendent 3: The Year’s Best Transgender Speculative Fiction edited by Bogi Takács – this series just keeps getting stronger every year, and I cannot wait for the fourth volume which should be out very soon!

Witchmark CoverWitchmark by C.L. Polk – a beautifully-built world of magic, which also explores the horrors of war, and the complications of family, while unfolding one of the most satisfying slow burns of a relationship I’ve ever seen put to page.

The Mere Wife by Maria Dahvana Headley – a glorious retelling of the legend of Beowulf, which focuses on the women of the tale while shining a light on the trauma of war and exploring what it means to be monstrous.

Black Leopard, Red Wolf by Marlon James – a dense and rich fantasy to sink your teeth into, which will sink its teeth into you right back. A dark, violent, and fascinating weaving-together of myth, magic, friendship, family, pain, and betrayal.

The Devourers by Indra Das – a drop-dead gorgeous novel about animal nature, human nature, and the intersection between the two that layers its story together and moves seamless between past and present, myth and reality, to create a stunning whole.

Sooner or Later Everything Falls into the Sea by Sarah Pinsker – a fantastic (in all senses of the word) debut collection echoing with themes of loss, magic, family, music, memory, and love.

Short Fiction

Beyond the El by John Chu – a story of complicated family relationships and how food can bring people together and tear them apart.

Tyrannocora Regina by Leonie Sky – time travel, dinosaurs, roller derby, and the messiest of family relationships. What more could you want?

Uncanny Magazine Dinosaur CoverYou Can Make a Dinosaur, But You Can’t Help Me by K.M. Szpara – speaking of dinosaurs and messy family relationships, here’s a lovely and painful story about two trans men negotiating their relationship with each other while one fights to be seen by his father, who is far more interested in his island full of dinosaurs than in his own son.

The Message by Vanessa Fogg – for the protagonist, decoding an alien message may very well be easier than simply sharing her feelings with her best friend, at least outside the bounds of their shared fan fiction.

Pull of the Herd by Suzan Palumbo – a beautiful and heartbreaking take on the animal bride trope.

Some Personal Arguments in Support of the Better You (Based on Early Interactions) by Debbie Urbanski – an AI story with Gothic undertones as a woman considers replacing herself with a more “agreeable” version for her family’s benefit.

Coyote Wears a Suit Now by Ani Fox – sometimes a trickster’s meddling ends up benefiting those meddled with, but that doesn’t mean things won’t get messy along the way.

Podcasts and Publications

Anathema Magazine CoverGone by Sunny Moraine – the inexplicable disappearance of everyone in the protagonist’s immediate surroundings is only the beginning; from there, things only get weirder.

Alice Isn’t Dead by Joseph Fink – a trucker sets out on an unsettling journey to find her wife, holding onto the hope that despite all evidence to the contrary (and despite being hunted by something unnatural) she isn’t dead.

Glittership edited by Keffy R. M. Kehrli – a podcast devoted to original and reprinted queer fiction.

Vulture Bones edited by B.R. Sanders – a quarterly speculative fiction magazine devoted to trans and enby authors.

Anathema edited by Michael Matheson – a tri-annual speculative fiction magazine devoted to the work of queer authors of color.

There you have it! These recommendations are just scratching the surface of all the wonderful queer content out there. That being the case, please do add your own recommendations in the comments. Happy Pride Month, happy summer, and happy reading!

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